2006 Census Area Profiles

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Profile for Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas, 2006 Census

About this variable: Profile of Forward Sortation Areas (2172)

Definition

No definition is available for this variable.

Values

  1. Population, 2006 - 100% data Footnote 1
  2. Total population by sex and age groups - 100% data Footnote 2
  3. Male, total
  4. 0 to 4 years
  5. 5 to 9 years
  6. 10 to 14 years
  7. 15 to 19 years
  8. 20 to 24 years
  9. 25 to 29 years
  10. 30 to 34 years
  11. 35 to 39 years
  12. 40 to 44 years
  13. 45 to 49 years
  14. 50 to 54 years
  15. 55 to 59 years
  16. 60 to 64 years
  17. 65 to 69 years
  18. 70 to 74 years
  19. 75 to 79 years
  20. 80 to 84 years
  21. 85 years and over
  22. Female, total
  23. 0 to 4 years
  24. 5 to 9 years
  25. 10 to 14 years
  26. 15 to 19 years
  27. 20 to 24 years
  28. 25 to 29 years
  29. 30 to 34 years
  30. 35 to 39 years
  31. 40 to 44 years
  32. 45 to 49 years
  33. 50 to 54 years
  34. 55 to 59 years
  35. 60 to 64 years
  36. 65 to 69 years
  37. 70 to 74 years
  38. 75 to 79 years
  39. 80 to 84 years
  40. 85 years and over
  41. Total population 15 years and over by legal marital status - 100% data Footnote 41
  42. Never legally married (single)
  43. Legally married (and not separated) Footnote 43
  44. Separated, but still legally married
  45. Divorced
  46. Widowed
  47. Total population 15 years and over by common-law status - 100% data Footnote 47
  48. Not in a common-law relationship
  49. In a common-law relationship
  50. Total number of census families in private households - 20% sample data Footnote 50
  51. Size of census family: 2 persons
  52. Size of census family: 3 persons
  53. Size of census family: 4 persons
  54. Size of census family: 5 or more persons
  55. Total number of census families in private households - 20% sample data Footnote 55
  56. Total couple families by family structure and number of children
  57. Married couples
  58. Without children at home
  59. With children at home
  60. 1 child
  61. 2 children
  62. 3 or more children
  63. Common-law couples
  64. Without children at home
  65. With children at home
  66. 1 child
  67. 2 children
  68. 3 or more children
  69. Total lone-parent families by sex of parent and number of children
  70. Female parent
  71. 1 child
  72. 2 children
  73. 3 or more children
  74. Male parent
  75. 1 child
  76. 2 children
  77. 3 or more children
  78. Total number of children at home - 20% sample data Footnote 78
  79. Under six years of age
  80. 6 to 14 years
  81. 15 to 17 years
  82. 18 to 24 years
  83. 25 years and over
  84. Average number of children at home per census family Footnote 84
  85. Total number of persons in private households - 20% sample data
  86. Number of persons not in census families
  87. Living with relatives Footnote 87
  88. Living with non-relatives only
  89. Living alone
  90. Number of census family persons
  91. Average number of persons per census family
  92. Total number of persons aged 65 years and over - 20% sample data
  93. Number of persons not in census families aged 65 years and over
  94. Living with relatives Footnote 94
  95. Living with non-relatives only
  96. Living alone
  97. Number of census family persons aged 65 years and over
  98. Total number of occupied private dwellings - 20% sample data Footnote 98
  99. Average number of rooms per dwelling Footnote 99
  100. Average number of bedrooms per dwelling Footnote 100
  101. Total number of occupied private dwellings by housing tenure - 20% sample data Footnote 101
  102. Owned
  103. Rented
  104. Band housing
  105. Total number of occupied private dwellings by condition of dwelling - 20% sample data Footnote 105
  106. Regular maintenance only
  107. Minor repairs
  108. Major repairs
  109. Total number of occupied private dwellings by period of construction - 20% sample data Footnote 109
  110. Period of construction, before 1946
  111. Period of construction, 1946 to 1960
  112. Period of construction, 1961 to 1970
  113. Period of construction, 1971 to 1980
  114. Period of construction, 1981 to 1985
  115. Period of construction, 1986 to 1990
  116. Period of construction, 1991 to 1995
  117. Period of construction, 1996 to 2000
  118. Period of construction, 2001 to 2006 Footnote 118
  119. Total number of occupied private dwellings by structural type of dwelling - 100% data Footnote 119
  120. Single-detached house
  121. Semi-detached house
  122. Row house
  123. Apartment, duplex
  124. Apartment, building that has five or more storeys
  125. Apartment, building that has fewer than five storeys
  126. Other single-attached house
  127. Movable dwelling Footnote 127
  128. Total number of private households by household size - 100% data Footnote 128
  129. 1 person
  130. 2 persons
  131. 3 persons
  132. 4 to 5 persons
  133. 6 or more persons
  134. Number of persons in private households
  135. Average number of persons in private households
  136. Total number of private households by household type - 20% sample data Footnote 136
  137. One-family households
  138. Multiple-family households
  139. Non-family households
  140. Total population by mother tongue - 20% sample data Footnote 140
  141. Single responses
  142. English
  143. French
  144. Non-official languages
  145. Algonquin
  146. Atikamekw
  147. Blackfoot
  148. Carrier
  149. Chilcotin
  150. Chipewyan
  151. Cree
  152. Siouan languages (Dakota/Sioux)
  153. Dene
  154. Dogrib
  155. Gitksan
  156. Inuinnaqtun
  157. Inuktitut, n.i.e.
  158. Kutchin-Gwich'in (Loucheux)
  159. Malecite
  160. Mi'kmaq
  161. Mohawk
  162. Montagnais-Naskapi
  163. Nisga'a
  164. North Slave (Hare)
  165. Ojibway
  166. Oji-Cree
  167. Shuswap
  168. South Slave
  169. Tlingit
  170. Italian
  171. Portuguese
  172. Romanian
  173. Spanish
  174. Danish
  175. Dutch
  176. Flemish
  177. Frisian
  178. German
  179. Norwegian
  180. Swedish
  181. Yiddish
  182. Bosnian
  183. Bulgarian
  184. Croatian
  185. Czech
  186. Macedonian
  187. Polish
  188. Russian
  189. Serbian
  190. Serbo-Croatian
  191. Slovak
  192. Slovenian
  193. Ukrainian
  194. Latvian
  195. Lithuanian
  196. Estonian
  197. Finnish
  198. Hungarian
  199. Greek
  200. Armenian
  201. Turkish
  202. Amharic
  203. Arabic
  204. Hebrew
  205. Maltese
  206. Somali
  207. Tigrigna
  208. Bengali
  209. Gujarati
  210. Hindi
  211. Kurdish
  212. Panjabi (Punjabi)
  213. Pashto
  214. Persian (Farsi)
  215. Sindhi
  216. Sinhala (Sinhalese)
  217. Urdu
  218. Malayalam
  219. Tamil
  220. Telugu
  221. Japanese
  222. Korean
  223. Cantonese
  224. Chinese, n.o.s. Footnote 224
  225. Mandarin
  226. Taiwanese
  227. Lao
  228. Khmer (Cambodian)
  229. Vietnamese
  230. Bisayan languages
  231. Ilocano
  232. Malay
  233. Tagalog (Pilipino, Filipino)
  234. Akan (Twi)
  235. Swahili
  236. Creoles
  237. Other languages Footnote 237
  238. Multiple responses
  239. English and French
  240. English and non-official language
  241. French and non-official language
  242. English, French and non-official language
  243. Total population by knowledge of official languages - 20% sample data Footnote 243
  244. English only
  245. French only
  246. English and French
  247. Neither English nor French
  248. Total population by first official language spoken - 20% sample data Footnote 248
  249. English
  250. French
  251. English and French
  252. Neither English nor French
  253. Official language minority - (number) Footnote 253
  254. Official language minority - (percentage) Footnote 254
  255. Total population by language spoken most often at home - 20% sample data Footnote 255
  256. Single responses
  257. English
  258. French
  259. Non-official languages
  260. Algonquin
  261. Atikamekw
  262. Blackfoot
  263. Carrier
  264. Chilcotin
  265. Chipewyan
  266. Cree
  267. Siouan languages (Dakota/Sioux)
  268. Dene
  269. Dogrib
  270. Gitksan
  271. Inuinnaqtun
  272. Inuktitut, n.i.e.
  273. Kutchin-Gwich'in (Loucheux)
  274. Malecite
  275. Mi'kmaq
  276. Mohawk
  277. Montagnais-Naskapi
  278. Nisga'a
  279. North Slave (Hare)
  280. Ojibway
  281. Oji-Cree
  282. Shuswap
  283. South Slave
  284. Tlingit
  285. Italian
  286. Portuguese
  287. Romanian
  288. Spanish
  289. Danish
  290. Dutch
  291. Flemish
  292. Frisian
  293. German
  294. Norwegian
  295. Swedish
  296. Yiddish
  297. Bosnian
  298. Bulgarian
  299. Croatian
  300. Czech
  301. Macedonian
  302. Polish
  303. Russian
  304. Serbian
  305. Serbo-Croatian
  306. Slovak
  307. Slovenian
  308. Ukrainian
  309. Latvian
  310. Lithuanian
  311. Estonian
  312. Finnish
  313. Hungarian
  314. Greek
  315. Armenian
  316. Turkish
  317. Amharic
  318. Arabic
  319. Hebrew
  320. Maltese
  321. Somali
  322. Tigrigna
  323. Bengali
  324. Gujarati
  325. Hindi
  326. Kurdish
  327. Panjabi (Punjabi)
  328. Pashto
  329. Persian (Farsi)
  330. Sindhi
  331. Sinhala (Sinhalese)
  332. Urdu
  333. Malayalam
  334. Tamil
  335. Telugu
  336. Japanese
  337. Korean
  338. Cantonese
  339. Chinese, n.o.s. Footnote 339
  340. Mandarin
  341. Taiwanese
  342. Lao
  343. Khmer (Cambodian)
  344. Vietnamese
  345. Bisayan languages
  346. Ilocano
  347. Malay
  348. Tagalog (Pilipino, Filipino)
  349. Akan (Twi)
  350. Swahili
  351. Creoles
  352. Other languages Footnote 352
  353. Multiple responses
  354. English and French
  355. English and non-official language
  356. French and non-official language
  357. English, French and non-official language
  358. Algonquin - Various non-official languages spoken - 20% sample data Footnote 358
  359. Atikamekw
  360. Blackfoot
  361. Carrier
  362. Chilcotin
  363. Chipewyan
  364. Cree
  365. Siouan languages (Dakota/Sioux)
  366. Dene
  367. Dogrib
  368. Gitksan
  369. Inuinnaqtun
  370. Inuktitut, n.i.e.
  371. Kutchin-Gwich'in (Loucheux)
  372. Malecite
  373. Mi'kmaq
  374. Mohawk
  375. Montagnais-Naskapi
  376. Nisga'a
  377. North Slave (Hare)
  378. Ojibway
  379. Oji-Cree
  380. Shuswap
  381. South Slave
  382. Tlingit
  383. Italian
  384. Portuguese
  385. Romanian
  386. Spanish
  387. Danish
  388. Dutch
  389. Flemish
  390. Frisian
  391. German
  392. Norwegian
  393. Swedish
  394. Yiddish
  395. Bosnian
  396. Bulgarian
  397. Croatian
  398. Czech
  399. Macedonian
  400. Polish
  401. Russian
  402. Serbian
  403. Serbo-Croatian
  404. Slovak
  405. Slovenian
  406. Ukrainian
  407. Latvian
  408. Lithuanian
  409. Estonian
  410. Finnish
  411. Hungarian
  412. Greek
  413. Armenian
  414. Turkish
  415. Amharic
  416. Arabic
  417. Hebrew
  418. Maltese
  419. Somali
  420. Tigrigna
  421. Bengali
  422. Gujarati
  423. Hindi
  424. Kurdish
  425. Panjabi (Punjabi)
  426. Pashto
  427. Persian (Farsi)
  428. Sindhi
  429. Sinhala (Sinhalese)
  430. Urdu
  431. Malayalam
  432. Tamil
  433. Telugu
  434. Japanese
  435. Korean
  436. Cantonese
  437. Chinese, n.o.s. Footnote 437
  438. Mandarin
  439. Taiwanese
  440. Lao
  441. Khmer (Cambodian)
  442. Vietnamese
  443. Bisayan languages
  444. Ilocano
  445. Malay
  446. Tagalog (Pilipino, Filipino)
  447. Akan (Twi)
  448. Swahili
  449. Creoles
  450. Other languages Footnote 450
  451. Total - Mobility status 1 year ago - 20% sample data Footnote 451
  452. Non-movers
  453. Movers
  454. Non-migrants
  455. Migrants
  456. Internal migrants
  457. Intraprovincial migrants
  458. Interprovincial migrants
  459. External migrants
  460. Total - Mobility status 5 years ago - 20% sample data Footnote 460
  461. Non-movers
  462. Movers
  463. Non-migrants
  464. Migrants
  465. Internal migrants
  466. Intraprovincial migrants
  467. Interprovincial migrants
  468. External migrants
  469. Total population by citizenship - 20% sample data Footnote 469
  470. Canadian citizens
  471. Canadian citizens under age 18
  472. Canadian citizens age 18 and over
  473. Not Canadian citizens Footnote 473
  474. Total population by immigrant status and place of birth - 20% sample data Footnote 474
  475. Non-immigrants Footnote 475
  476. Born in province of residence
  477. Born outside province of residence
  478. Immigrants Footnote 478
  479. United States of America
  480. Central America
  481. Caribbean and Bermuda
  482. South America
  483. Europe
  484. Western Europe
  485. Eastern Europe
  486. Southern Europe
  487. Italy
  488. Other Southern Europe
  489. Northern Europe
  490. United Kingdom
  491. Other Northern Europe
  492. Africa
  493. Western Africa
  494. Eastern Africa
  495. Northern Africa
  496. Central Africa
  497. Southern Africa
  498. Asia and the Middle East
  499. West Central Asia and the Middle East
  500. Eastern Asia
  501. China, People's Republic of
  502. Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region
  503. Other Eastern Asia
  504. Southeast Asia
  505. Philippines
  506. Other Southeast Asia
  507. Southern Asia
  508. India
  509. Other Southern Asia
  510. Oceania and other Footnote 510
  511. Non-permanent residents Footnote 511
  512. Total recent immigrants by selected places of birth - 20% sample data Footnote 512
  513. United States of America
  514. Central America
  515. Caribbean and Bermuda
  516. South America
  517. Europe
  518. Western Europe
  519. Eastern Europe
  520. Southern Europe
  521. Italy
  522. Other Southern Europe
  523. Northern Europe
  524. United Kingdom
  525. Other Northern Europe
  526. Africa
  527. Western Africa
  528. Eastern Africa
  529. Northern Africa
  530. Central Africa
  531. Southern Africa
  532. Asia and the Middle East
  533. West Central Asia and the Middle East
  534. Eastern Asia
  535. China, People's Republic of
  536. Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region
  537. Other Eastern Asia
  538. Southeast Asia
  539. Philippines
  540. Other Southeast Asia
  541. Southern Asia
  542. India
  543. Other Southern Asia
  544. Oceania and other Footnote 544
  545. Total immigrant population by period of immigration - 20% sample data Footnote 545
  546. Before 1961
  547. 1961 to 1970
  548. 1971 to 1980
  549. 1981 to 1990
  550. 1991 to 2000
  551. 1991 to 1995
  552. 1996 to 2000
  553. 2001 to 2006 Footnote 553
  554. Total immigrant population by age at immigration - 20% sample data Footnote 554
  555. Under 5 years
  556. 5 to 14 years
  557. 15 to 24 years
  558. 25 to 44 years
  559. 45 years and over
  560. Total population 15 years and older by generation status - 20% sample data Footnote 560
  561. 1st generation Footnote 561
  562. 2nd generation Footnote 562
  563. 3rd generation or more Footnote 563
  564. Total population by Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal identity population - 20% sample data Footnote 564
  565. Total Aboriginal identity population Footnote 565
  566. North American Indian single response Footnote 566
  567. Métis single response
  568. Inuit single response
  569. Multiple Aboriginal identity responses
  570. Aboriginal responses not included elsewhere Footnote 570
  571. Non-Aboriginal identity population
  572. Total population by Registered Indian status - 20% sample data Footnote 572
  573. Registered Indian Footnote 573
  574. Not a Registered Indian
  575. Total population 15 years and over by labour force activity - 20% sample data Footnote 575
  576. In the labour force Footnote 576
  577. Employed Footnote 577
  578. Unemployed Footnote 578
  579. Not in the labour force Footnote 579
  580. Participation rate Footnote 580
  581. Employment rate Footnote 581
  582. Unemployment rate Footnote 582
  583. Population 15 to 24 years - Labour force activity Footnote 583
  584. In the labour force Footnote 584
  585. Employed Footnote 585
  586. Unemployed Footnote 586
  587. Not in the labour force Footnote 587
  588. Participation rate Footnote 588
  589. Employment rate Footnote 589
  590. Unemployment rate Footnote 590
  591. Population 25 years and over - Labour force activity Footnote 591
  592. In the labour force Footnote 592
  593. Employed Footnote 593
  594. Unemployed Footnote 594
  595. Not in the labour force Footnote 595
  596. Participation rate Footnote 596
  597. Employment rate Footnote 597
  598. Unemployment rate Footnote 598
  599. Males 15 years and over - Labour force activity Footnote 599
  600. In the labour force Footnote 600
  601. Employed Footnote 601
  602. Unemployed Footnote 602
  603. Not in the labour force Footnote 603
  604. Participation rate Footnote 604
  605. Employment rate Footnote 605
  606. Unemployment rate Footnote 606
  607. Males 15 to 24 years - Labour force activity Footnote 607
  608. In the labour force Footnote 608
  609. Employed Footnote 609
  610. Unemployed Footnote 610
  611. Not in the labour force Footnote 611
  612. Participation rate Footnote 612
  613. Employment rate Footnote 613
  614. Unemployment rate Footnote 614
  615. Males 25 years and over - Labour force activity Footnote 615
  616. In the labour force Footnote 616
  617. Employed Footnote 617
  618. Unemployed Footnote 618
  619. Not in the labour force Footnote 619
  620. Participation rate Footnote 620
  621. Employment rate Footnote 621
  622. Unemployment rate Footnote 622
  623. Females 15 years and over - Labour force activity Footnote 623
  624. In the labour force Footnote 624
  625. Employed Footnote 625
  626. Unemployed Footnote 626
  627. Not in the labour force Footnote 627
  628. Participation rate Footnote 628
  629. Employment rate Footnote 629
  630. Unemployment rate Footnote 630
  631. Females 15 to 24 years - Labour force activity Footnote 631
  632. In the labour force Footnote 632
  633. Employed Footnote 633
  634. Unemployed Footnote 634
  635. Not in the labour force Footnote 635
  636. Participation rate Footnote 636
  637. Employment rate Footnote 637
  638. Unemployment rate Footnote 638
  639. Females 25 years and over - Labour force activity Footnote 639
  640. In the labour force Footnote 640
  641. Employed Footnote 641
  642. Unemployed Footnote 642
  643. Not in the labour force Footnote 643
  644. Participation rate Footnote 644
  645. Employment rate Footnote 645
  646. Unemployment rate Footnote 646
  647. Total population 15 years and over by presence of children and labour force activity - 20% sample data Footnote 647
  648. In the labour force Footnote 648
  649. Employed Footnote 649
  650. Unemployed Footnote 650
  651. Not in the labour force Footnote 651
  652. Participation rate Footnote 652
  653. Employment rate Footnote 653
  654. Unemployment rate Footnote 654
  655. Population 15 years and over in private households with no children at home Footnote 655
  656. In the labour force Footnote 656
  657. Employed Footnote 657
  658. Unemployed Footnote 658
  659. Not in the labour force Footnote 659
  660. Participation rate Footnote 660
  661. Employment rate Footnote 661
  662. Unemployment rate Footnote 662
  663. Population 15 years and over in private households with children at home Footnote 663
  664. In the labour force Footnote 664
  665. Employed Footnote 665
  666. Unemployed Footnote 666
  667. Not in the labour force Footnote 667
  668. Participation rate Footnote 668
  669. Employment rate Footnote 669
  670. Unemployment rate Footnote 670
  671. Population 15 years and over in private households with children under 6 years only Footnote 671
  672. In the labour force Footnote 672
  673. Employed Footnote 673
  674. Unemployed Footnote 674
  675. Not in the labour force Footnote 675
  676. Participation rate Footnote 676
  677. Employment rate Footnote 677
  678. Unemployment rate Footnote 678
  679. Population 15 years and over in private households with children under 6 years as well as children 6 years and over Footnote 679
  680. In the labour force Footnote 680
  681. Employed Footnote 681
  682. Unemployed Footnote 682
  683. Not in the labour force Footnote 683
  684. Participation rate Footnote 684
  685. Employment rate Footnote 685
  686. Unemployment rate Footnote 686
  687. Population 15 years and over in private households with children 6 years and over only Footnote 687
  688. In the labour force Footnote 688
  689. Employed Footnote 689
  690. Unemployed Footnote 690
  691. Not in the labour force Footnote 691
  692. Participation rate Footnote 692
  693. Employment rate Footnote 693
  694. Unemployment rate Footnote 694
  695. Males 15 years and over in private households - Presence of children and labour force activity Footnote 695
  696. In the labour force Footnote 696
  697. Employed Footnote 697
  698. Unemployed Footnote 698
  699. Not in the labour force Footnote 699
  700. Participation rate Footnote 700
  701. Employment rate Footnote 701
  702. Unemployment rate Footnote 702
  703. Males 15 years and over in private households with no children at home Footnote 703
  704. In the labour force Footnote 704
  705. Employed Footnote 705
  706. Unemployed Footnote 706
  707. Not in the labour force Footnote 707
  708. Participation rate Footnote 708
  709. Employment rate Footnote 709
  710. Unemployment rate Footnote 710
  711. Males 15 years and over in private households with children at home Footnote 711
  712. In the labour force Footnote 712
  713. Employed Footnote 713
  714. Unemployed Footnote 714
  715. Not in the labour force Footnote 715
  716. Participation rate Footnote 716
  717. Employment rate Footnote 717
  718. Unemployment rate Footnote 718
  719. Males 15 years and over in private households with children under 6 years only Footnote 719
  720. In the labour force Footnote 720
  721. Employed Footnote 721
  722. Unemployed Footnote 722
  723. Not in the labour force Footnote 723
  724. Participation rate Footnote 724
  725. Employment rate Footnote 725
  726. Unemployment rate Footnote 726
  727. Males 15 years and over in private households with children under 6 years as well as children 6 years and over Footnote 727
  728. In the labour force Footnote 728
  729. Employed Footnote 729
  730. Unemployed Footnote 730
  731. Not in the labour force Footnote 731
  732. Participation rate Footnote 732
  733. Employment rate Footnote 733
  734. Unemployment rate Footnote 734
  735. Males 15 years and over in private households with children 6 years and over only Footnote 735
  736. In the labour force Footnote 736
  737. Employed Footnote 737
  738. Unemployed Footnote 738
  739. Not in the labour force Footnote 739
  740. Participation rate Footnote 740
  741. Employment rate Footnote 741
  742. Unemployment rate Footnote 742
  743. Females 15 years and over in private households - Presence of children and labour force activity Footnote 743
  744. In the labour force Footnote 744
  745. Employed Footnote 745
  746. Unemployed Footnote 746
  747. Not in the labour force Footnote 747
  748. Participation rate Footnote 748
  749. Employment rate Footnote 749
  750. Unemployment rate Footnote 750
  751. Females 15 years and over in private households with no children at home Footnote 751
  752. In the labour force Footnote 752
  753. Employed Footnote 753
  754. Unemployed Footnote 754
  755. Not in the labour force Footnote 755
  756. Participation rate Footnote 756
  757. Employment rate Footnote 757
  758. Unemployment rate Footnote 758
  759. Females 15 years and over in private households with children at home Footnote 759
  760. In the labour force Footnote 760
  761. Employed Footnote 761
  762. Unemployed Footnote 762
  763. Not in the labour force Footnote 763
  764. Participation rate Footnote 764
  765. Employment rate Footnote 765
  766. Unemployment rate Footnote 766
  767. Females 15 years and over in private households with children under 6 years only Footnote 767
  768. In the labour force Footnote 768
  769. Employed Footnote 769
  770. Unemployed Footnote 770
  771. Not in the labour force Footnote 771
  772. Participation rate Footnote 772
  773. Employment rate Footnote 773
  774. Unemployment rate Footnote 774
  775. Females 15 years and over in private households with children under 6 years as well as children 6 years and over Footnote 775
  776. In the labour force Footnote 776
  777. Employed Footnote 777
  778. Unemployed Footnote 778
  779. Not in the labour force Footnote 779
  780. Participation rate Footnote 780
  781. Employment rate Footnote 781
  782. Unemployment rate Footnote 782
  783. Females 15 years and over in private households with children 6 years and over only Footnote 783
  784. In the labour force Footnote 784
  785. Employed Footnote 785
  786. Unemployed Footnote 786
  787. Not in the labour force Footnote 787
  788. Participation rate Footnote 788
  789. Employment rate Footnote 789
  790. Unemployment rate Footnote 790
  791. Total labour force 15 years and over by class of worker - 20% sample data Footnote 791
  792. Class of worker - Not applicable Footnote 792
  793. All classes of worker Footnote 793
  794. Paid workers
  795. Employees
  796. Self-employed (incorporated)
  797. Without paid help
  798. With paid help
  799. Self-employed (unincorporated)
  800. Without paid help
  801. With paid help
  802. Unpaid family workers
  803. Male labour force 15 years and over - class of worker Footnote 803
  804. Class of worker - Not applicable Footnote 804
  805. All classes of worker Footnote 805
  806. Paid workers
  807. Employees
  808. Self-employed (incorporated)
  809. Without paid help
  810. With paid help
  811. Self-employed (unincorporated)
  812. Without paid help
  813. With paid help
  814. Unpaid family workers
  815. Female labour force 15 years and over - class of worker Footnote 815
  816. Class of worker - Not applicable Footnote 816
  817. All classes of worker Footnote 817
  818. Paid workers
  819. Employees
  820. Self-employed (incorporated)
  821. Without paid help
  822. With paid help
  823. Self-employed (unincorporated)
  824. Without paid help
  825. With paid help
  826. Unpaid family workers
  827. Total labour force 15 years and over by occupation - National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006 - 20% sample data Footnote 827
  828. Occupation - Not applicable Footnote 828
  829. All occupations Footnote 829
  830. A Management occupations
  831. A0 Senior management occupations
  832. A1 Specialist managers
  833. A2 Managers in retail trade, food and accommodation services
  834. A3 Other managers, n.e.c.
  835. B Business, finance and administration occupations
  836. B0 Professional occupations in business and finance
  837. B1 Finance and insurance administration occupations
  838. B2 Secretaries
  839. B3 Administrative and regulatory occupations
  840. B4 Clerical supervisors
  841. B5 Clerical occupations
  842. C Natural and applied sciences and related occupations
  843. C0 Professional occupations in natural and applied sciences
  844. C1 Technical occupations related to natural and applied sciences
  845. D Health occupations
  846. D0 Professional occupations in health
  847. D1 Nurse supervisors and registered nurses
  848. D2 Technical and related occupations in health
  849. D3 Assisting occupations in support of health services
  850. E Occupations in social science, education, government service and religion
  851. E0 Judges, lawyers, psychologists, social workers, ministers of religion, and policy and program officers
  852. E1 Teachers and professors
  853. E2 Paralegals, social services workers and occupations in education and religion, n.e.c.
  854. F Occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport
  855. F0 Professional occupations in art and culture
  856. F1 Technical occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport
  857. G Sales and service occupations
  858. G0 Sales and service supervisors
  859. G1 Wholesale, technical, insurance, real estate sales specialists, and retail, wholesale and grain buyers
  860. G2 Retail salespersons and sales clerks
  861. G3 Cashiers
  862. G4 Chefs and cooks
  863. G5 Occupations in food and beverage service
  864. G6 Occupations in protective services
  865. G7 Occupations in travel and accommodation, including attendants in recreation and sport
  866. G8 Child care and home support workers
  867. G9 Sales and service occupations, n.e.c.
  868. H Trades, transport and equipment operators and related occupations
  869. H0 Contractors and supervisors in trades and transportation
  870. H1 Construction trades
  871. H2 Stationary engineers, power station operators and electrical trades and telecommunications occupations
  872. H3 Machinists, metal forming, shaping and erecting occupations
  873. H4 Mechanics
  874. H5 Other trades, n.e.c.
  875. H6 Heavy equipment and crane operators, including drillers
  876. H7 Transportation equipment operators and related workers, excluding labourers
  877. H8 Trades helpers, construction and transportation labourers and related occupations
  878. I Occupations unique to primary industry
  879. I0 Occupations unique to agriculture, excluding labourers
  880. I1 Occupations unique to forestry operations, mining, oil and gas extraction and fishing, excluding labourers
  881. I2 Primary production labourers
  882. J Occupations unique to processing, manufacturing and utilities
  883. J0 Supervisors in manufacturing
  884. J1 Machine operators in manufacturing
  885. J2 Assemblers in manufacturing
  886. J3 Labourers in processing, manufacturing and utilities
  887. Male labour force 15 years and over by occupation - National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006 Footnote 887
  888. Occupation - Not applicable Footnote 888
  889. All occupations Footnote 889
  890. A Management occupations
  891. A0 Senior management occupations
  892. A1 Specialist managers
  893. A2 Managers in retail trade, food and accommodation services
  894. A3 Other managers, n.e.c.
  895. B Business, finance and administration occupations
  896. B0 Professional occupations in business and finance
  897. B1 Finance and insurance administration occupations
  898. B2 Secretaries
  899. B3 Administrative and regulatory occupations
  900. B4 Clerical supervisors
  901. B5 Clerical occupations
  902. C Natural and applied sciences and related occupations
  903. C0 Professional occupations in natural and applied sciences
  904. C1 Technical occupations related to natural and applied sciences
  905. D Health occupations
  906. D0 Professional occupations in health
  907. D1 Nurse supervisors and registered nurses
  908. D2 Technical and related occupations in health
  909. D3 Assisting occupations in support of health services
  910. E Occupations in social science, education, government service and religion
  911. E0 Judges, lawyers, psychologists, social workers, ministers of religion, and policy and program officers
  912. E1 Teachers and professors
  913. E2 Paralegals, social services workers and occupations in education and religion, n.e.c.
  914. F Occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport
  915. F0 Professional occupations in art and culture
  916. F1 Technical occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport
  917. G Sales and service occupations
  918. G0 Sales and service supervisors
  919. G1 Wholesale, technical, insurance, real estate sales specialists, and retail, wholesale and grain buyers
  920. G2 Retail salespersons and sales clerks
  921. G3 Cashiers
  922. G4 Chefs and cooks
  923. G5 Occupations in food and beverage service
  924. G6 Occupations in protective services
  925. G7 Occupations in travel and accommodation, including attendants in recreation and sport
  926. G8 Child care and home support workers
  927. G9 Sales and service occupations, n.e.c.
  928. H Trades, transport and equipment operators and related occupations
  929. H0 Contractors and supervisors in trades and transportation
  930. H1 Construction trades
  931. H2 Stationary engineers, power station operators and electrical trades and telecommunications occupations
  932. H3 Machinists, metal forming, shaping and erecting occupations
  933. H4 Mechanics
  934. H5 Other trades, n.e.c.
  935. H6 Heavy equipment and crane operators, including drillers
  936. H7 Transportation equipment operators and related workers, excluding labourers
  937. H8 Trades helpers, construction and transportation labourers and related occupations
  938. I Occupations unique to primary industry
  939. I0 Occupations unique to agriculture, excluding labourers
  940. I1 Occupations unique to forestry operations, mining, oil and gas extraction and fishing, excluding labourers
  941. I2 Primary production labourers
  942. J Occupations unique to processing, manufacturing and utilities
  943. J0 Supervisors in manufacturing
  944. J1 Machine operators in manufacturing
  945. J2 Assemblers in manufacturing
  946. J3 Labourers in processing, manufacturing and utilities
  947. Female labour force 15 years and over by occupation - National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006 Footnote 947
  948. Occupation - Not applicable Footnote 948
  949. All occupations Footnote 949
  950. A Management occupations
  951. A0 Senior management occupations
  952. A1 Specialist managers
  953. A2 Managers in retail trade, food and accommodation services
  954. A3 Other managers, n.e.c.
  955. B Business, finance and administration occupations
  956. B0 Professional occupations in business and finance
  957. B1 Finance and insurance administration occupations
  958. B2 Secretaries
  959. B3 Administrative and regulatory occupations
  960. B4 Clerical supervisors
  961. B5 Clerical occupations
  962. C Natural and applied sciences and related occupations
  963. C0 Professional occupations in natural and applied sciences
  964. C1 Technical occupations related to natural and applied sciences
  965. D Health occupations
  966. D0 Professional occupations in health
  967. D1 Nurse supervisors and registered nurses
  968. D2 Technical and related occupations in health
  969. D3 Assisting occupations in support of health services
  970. E Occupations in social science, education, government service and religion
  971. E0 Judges, lawyers, psychologists, social workers, ministers of religion, and policy and program officers
  972. E1 Teachers and professors
  973. E2 Paralegals, social services workers and occupations in education and religion, n.e.c.
  974. F Occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport
  975. F0 Professional occupations in art and culture
  976. F1 Technical occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport
  977. G Sales and service occupations
  978. G0 Sales and service supervisors
  979. G1 Wholesale, technical, insurance, real estate sales specialists, and retail, wholesale and grain buyers
  980. G2 Retail salespersons and sales clerks
  981. G3 Cashiers
  982. G4 Chefs and cooks
  983. G5 Occupations in food and beverage service
  984. G6 Occupations in protective services
  985. G7 Occupations in travel and accommodation, including attendants in recreation and sport
  986. G8 Child care and home support workers
  987. G9 Sales and service occupations, n.e.c.
  988. H Trades, transport and equipment operators and related occupations
  989. H0 Contractors and supervisors in trades and transportation
  990. H1 Construction trades
  991. H2 Stationary engineers, power station operators and electrical trades and telecommunications occupations
  992. H3 Machinists, metal forming, shaping and erecting occupations
  993. H4 Mechanics
  994. H5 Other trades, n.e.c.
  995. H6 Heavy equipment and crane operators, including drillers
  996. H7 Transportation equipment operators and related workers, excluding labourers
  997. H8 Trades helpers, construction and transportation labourers and related occupations
  998. I Occupations unique to primary industry
  999. I0 Occupations unique to agriculture, excluding labourers
  1000. I1 Occupations unique to forestry operations, mining, oil and gas extraction and fishing, excluding labourers
  1001. I2 Primary production labourers
  1002. J Occupations unique to processing, manufacturing and utilities
  1003. J0 Supervisors in manufacturing
  1004. J1 Machine operators in manufacturing
  1005. J2 Assemblers in manufacturing
  1006. J3 Labourers in processing, manufacturing and utilities
  1007. Total labour force 15 years and over by industry - North American Industry Classification System 2002 - 20% sample data Footnote 1007
  1008. Industry - Not applicable Footnote 1008
  1009. All industries Footnote 1009
  1010. 11 Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting
  1011. 21 Mining and oil and gas extraction
  1012. 22 Utilities
  1013. 23 Construction
  1014. 31-33 Manufacturing
  1015. 41 Wholesale trade
  1016. 44-45 Retail trade
  1017. 48-49 Transportation and warehousing
  1018. 51 Information and cultural industries
  1019. 52 Finance and insurance
  1020. 53 Real estate and rental and leasing
  1021. 54 Professional, scientific and technical services
  1022. 55 Management of companies and enterprises
  1023. 56 Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services
  1024. 61 Educational services
  1025. 62 Health care and social assistance
  1026. 71 Arts, entertainment and recreation
  1027. 72 Accommodation and food services
  1028. 81 Other services (except public administration)
  1029. 91 Public administration
  1030. Male labour force 15 years and over - Industry - North American Industry Classification System 2002 Footnote 1030
  1031. Industry - Not applicable Footnote 1031
  1032. All industries Footnote 1032
  1033. 11 Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting
  1034. 21 Mining and oil and gas extraction
  1035. 22 Utilities
  1036. 23 Construction
  1037. 31-33 Manufacturing
  1038. 41 Wholesale trade
  1039. 44-45 Retail trade
  1040. 48-49 Transportation and warehousing
  1041. 51 Information and cultural industries
  1042. 52 Finance and insurance
  1043. 53 Real estate and rental and leasing
  1044. 54 Professional, scientific and technical services
  1045. 55 Management of companies and enterprises
  1046. 56 Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services
  1047. 61 Educational services
  1048. 62 Health care and social assistance
  1049. 71 Arts, entertainment and recreation
  1050. 72 Accommodation and food services
  1051. 81 Other services (except public administration)
  1052. 91 Public administration
  1053. Female labour force 15 years and over - Industry - North American Industry Classification System 2002 Footnote 1053
  1054. Industry - Not applicable Footnote 1054
  1055. All industries Footnote 1055
  1056. 11 Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting
  1057. 21 Mining and oil and gas extraction
  1058. 22 Utilities
  1059. 23 Construction
  1060. 31-33 Manufacturing
  1061. 41 Wholesale trade
  1062. 44-45 Retail trade
  1063. 48-49 Transportation and warehousing
  1064. 51 Information and cultural industries
  1065. 52 Finance and insurance
  1066. 53 Real estate and rental and leasing
  1067. 54 Professional, scientific and technical services
  1068. 55 Management of companies and enterprises
  1069. 56 Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services
  1070. 61 Educational services
  1071. 62 Health care and social assistance
  1072. 71 Arts, entertainment and recreation
  1073. 72 Accommodation and food services
  1074. 81 Other services (except public administration)
  1075. 91 Public administration
  1076. Total employed labour force 15 years and over by place of work status - 20% sample data Footnote 1076
  1077. Usual place of work
  1078. In census subdivision of residence
  1079. In different census subdivision
  1080. In same census division
  1081. At home
  1082. Outside Canada
  1083. No fixed workplace address
  1084. Males
  1085. Usual place of work
  1086. In census subdivision of residence
  1087. In different census subdivision
  1088. In same census division
  1089. At home
  1090. Outside Canada
  1091. No fixed workplace address
  1092. Females
  1093. Usual place of work
  1094. In census subdivision of residence
  1095. In different census subdivision
  1096. In same census division
  1097. At home
  1098. Outside Canada
  1099. No fixed workplace address
  1100. Total employed labour force 15 years and over with usual place of work or no fixed workplace address by mode of transportation - 20% sample data Footnote 1100
  1101. Car, truck, van, as driver
  1102. Car, truck, van, as passenger
  1103. Public transit
  1104. Walked
  1105. Bicycle
  1106. Motorcycle
  1107. Taxicab
  1108. Other method
  1109. Males with usual place of work or no fixed workplace address
  1110. Car, truck, van, as driver
  1111. Car, truck, van, as passenger
  1112. Public transit
  1113. Walked
  1114. Bicycle
  1115. Motorcycle
  1116. Taxicab
  1117. Other method
  1118. Females with usual place of work or no fixed workplace address
  1119. Car, truck, van, as driver
  1120. Car, truck, van, as passenger
  1121. Public transit
  1122. Walked
  1123. Bicycle
  1124. Motorcycle
  1125. Taxicab
  1126. Other method
  1127. Total population 15 years and over who worked since January 1, 2005 by language used most often at work - 20% sample data Footnote 1127
  1128. Single responses
  1129. English
  1130. French
  1131. Non-official languages
  1132. Chinese, n.o.s. Footnote 1132
  1133. Cantonese
  1134. Panjabi (Punjabi)
  1135. German
  1136. Mandarin
  1137. Portuguese
  1138. Spanish
  1139. Vietnamese
  1140. Korean
  1141. Italian
  1142. Other languages Footnote 1142
  1143. Multiple responses
  1144. English and French
  1145. English and non-official language
  1146. French and non-official language
  1147. English, French and non-official language
  1148. Total population 15 years and over by hours spent doing unpaid housework - 20% sample data Footnote 1148
  1149. No hours of unpaid housework
  1150. Less than 5 hours of unpaid housework
  1151. 5 to 14 hours of unpaid housework
  1152. 15 to 29 hours of unpaid housework
  1153. 30 to 59 hours of unpaid housework
  1154. 60 hours or more of unpaid housework
  1155. Males 15 years and over - Hours spent doing unpaid housework Footnote 1155
  1156. No hours of unpaid housework
  1157. Less than 5 hours of unpaid housework
  1158. 5 to 14 hours of unpaid housework
  1159. 15 to 29 hours of unpaid housework
  1160. 30 to 59 hours of unpaid housework
  1161. 60 hours or more of unpaid housework
  1162. Females 15 years and over - Hours spent doing unpaid housework Footnote 1162
  1163. No hours of unpaid housework
  1164. Less than 5 hours of unpaid housework
  1165. 5 to 14 hours of unpaid housework
  1166. 15 to 29 hours of unpaid housework
  1167. 30 to 59 hours of unpaid housework
  1168. 60 hours or more of unpaid housework
  1169. Total population 15 years and over by hours spent looking after children, without pay - 20% sample data Footnote 1169
  1170. No hours of unpaid child care
  1171. Less than 5 hours of unpaid child care
  1172. 5 to 14 hours of unpaid child care
  1173. 15 to 29 hours of unpaid child care
  1174. 30 to 59 hours of unpaid child care
  1175. 60 hours or more of unpaid child care
  1176. Males 15 years and over - Hours spent looking after children, without pay Footnote 1176
  1177. No hours of unpaid child care
  1178. Less than 5 hours of unpaid child care
  1179. 5 to 14 hours of unpaid child care
  1180. 15 to 29 hours of unpaid child care
  1181. 30 to 59 hours of unpaid child care
  1182. 60 hours or more of unpaid child care
  1183. Females 15 years and over - Hours spent looking after children, without pay Footnote 1183
  1184. No hours of unpaid child care
  1185. Less than 5 hours of unpaid child care
  1186. 5 to 14 hours of unpaid child care
  1187. 15 to 29 hours of unpaid child care
  1188. 30 to 59 hours of unpaid child care
  1189. 60 hours or more of unpaid child care
  1190. Total population 15 years and over by hours spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors - 20% sample data Footnote 1190
  1191. No hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
  1192. Less than 5 hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
  1193. 5 to 9 hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
  1194. 10 to 19 hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
  1195. 20 hours or more of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
  1196. Males 15 years and over - Hours spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors Footnote 1196
  1197. No hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
  1198. Less than 5 hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
  1199. 5 to 9 hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
  1200. 10 to 19 hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
  1201. 20 hours or more of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
  1202. Females 15 years and over - Hours spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors Footnote 1202
  1203. No hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
  1204. Less than 5 hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
  1205. 5 to 9 hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
  1206. 10 to 19 hours of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
  1207. 20 hours or more of unpaid care or assistance to seniors
  1208. Total male population 25 to 64 years with postsecondary qualifications by major field of study - Classification of Instructional Programs, 2000 - 20% sample data Footnote 1208
  1209. Education
  1210. Visual and performing arts, and communications technologies
  1211. Humanities
  1212. Social and behavioural sciences and law
  1213. Business, management and public administration
  1214. Physical and life sciences and technologies
  1215. Mathematics, computer and information sciences
  1216. Architecture, engineering, and related technologies
  1217. Agriculture, natural resources and conservation
  1218. Health, parks, recreation and fitness
  1219. Personal, protective and transportation services
  1220. Other fields of study Footnote 1220
  1221. Total female population 25 to 64 years with postsecondary qualifications by major field of study - Classification of Instructional Programs, 2000 - 20% sample data Footnote 1221
  1222. Education
  1223. Visual and performing arts, and communications technologies
  1224. Humanities
  1225. Social and behavioural sciences and law
  1226. Business, management and public administration
  1227. Physical and life sciences and technologies
  1228. Mathematics, computer and information sciences
  1229. Architecture, engineering, and related technologies
  1230. Agriculture, natural resources and conservation
  1231. Health, parks, recreation and fitness
  1232. Personal, protective and transportation services
  1233. Other fields of study Footnote 1233
  1234. Total population 15 to 24 years by highest certificate, diploma or degree - 20% sample data Footnote 1234
  1235. No certificate, diploma or degree
  1236. Certificate, diploma or degree
  1237. High school certificate or equivalent Footnote 1237
  1238. Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma
  1239. College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma Footnote 1239
  1240. University certificate, diploma or degree
  1241. University certificate or diploma below bachelor level
  1242. University certificate or degree
  1243. Bachelor's degree
  1244. University certificate or diploma above bachelor level
  1245. Degree in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine or optometry
  1246. Master's degree
  1247. Earned doctorate
  1248. Total population 25 to 64 years by highest certificate, diploma or degree - 20% sample data Footnote 1248
  1249. No certificate, diploma or degree
  1250. Certificate, diploma or degree
  1251. High school certificate or equivalent Footnote 1251
  1252. Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma
  1253. College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma Footnote 1253
  1254. University certificate, diploma or degree
  1255. University certificate or diploma below bachelor level
  1256. University certificate or degree
  1257. Bachelor's degree
  1258. University certificate or diploma above bachelor level
  1259. Degree in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine or optometry
  1260. Master's degree
  1261. Earned doctorate
  1262. Total population 65 years and over by highest certificate, diploma or degree - 20% sample data Footnote 1262
  1263. No certificate, diploma or degree
  1264. Certificate, diploma or degree
  1265. High school certificate or equivalent Footnote 1265
  1266. Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma
  1267. College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma Footnote 1267
  1268. University certificate, diploma or degree
  1269. University certificate or diploma below bachelor level
  1270. University certificate or degree
  1271. Bachelor's degree
  1272. University certificate or diploma above bachelor level
  1273. Degree in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine or optometry
  1274. Master's degree
  1275. Earned doctorate
  1276. Total population 25 to 64 years with postsecondary qualification by location of study - 20% sample data Footnote 1276
  1277. Inside Canada
  1278. Newfoundland and Labrador
  1279. Prince Edward Island
  1280. Nova Scotia
  1281. New Brunswick
  1282. Quebec
  1283. Ontario
  1284. Manitoba
  1285. Saskatchewan
  1286. Alberta
  1287. British Columbia
  1288. Yukon Territory
  1289. Northwest Territories
  1290. Nunavut
  1291. Outside Canada
  1292. Total population by Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal ancestry - 20% sample data Footnote 1292
  1293. Total Aboriginal ancestry population Footnote 1293
  1294. North American Indian single ancestry
  1295. North American Indian and non-Aboriginal ancestries
  1296. Métis single ancestry
  1297. Métis and non-Aboriginal ancestries
  1298. Inuit single ancestry
  1299. Inuit and non-Aboriginal ancestries
  1300. Other Aboriginal multiple ancestries Footnote 1300
  1301. Non-Aboriginal ancestry population
  1302. Total population by visible minority groups - 20% sample data
  1303. Total visible minority population Footnote 1303
  1304. Chinese
  1305. South Asian Footnote 1305
  1306. Black
  1307. Filipino
  1308. Latin American
  1309. Southeast Asian Footnote 1309
  1310. Arab
  1311. West Asian Footnote 1311
  1312. Korean
  1313. Japanese
  1314. Visible minority, n.i.e. Footnote 1314
  1315. Multiple visible minority Footnote 1315
  1316. Not a visible minority Footnote 1316
  1317. Total population by ethnic origin - 20% sample data Footnote 1317
  1318. British Isles origins
  1319. Cornish
  1320. English
  1321. Irish
  1322. Manx
  1323. Scottish
  1324. Welsh
  1325. British Isles, n.i.e. Footnote 1325
  1326. French origins
  1327. Acadian
  1328. French
  1329. Aboriginal origins
  1330. Inuit
  1331. Métis
  1332. North American Indian
  1333. Other North American origins
  1334. American
  1335. Canadian
  1336. Newfoundlander
  1337. Nova Scotian
  1338. Ontarian
  1339. Québécois
  1340. Other provincial or regional groups
  1341. Caribbean origins
  1342. Antiguan
  1343. Bahamian
  1344. Barbadian
  1345. Bermudan
  1346. Carib
  1347. Cuban
  1348. Dominican, n.o.s. Footnote 1348
  1349. Grenadian
  1350. Guyanese
  1351. Haitian
  1352. Jamaican
  1353. Kittitian/Nevisian
  1354. Martinican
  1355. Montserratan
  1356. Puerto Rican
  1357. St. Lucian
  1358. Trinidadian/Tobagonian
  1359. Vincentian/Grenadinian
  1360. West Indian
  1361. Caribbean, n.i.e. Footnote 1361
  1362. Latin, Central and South American origins
  1363. Aboriginal from Central/South America
  1364. Argentinian
  1365. Belizean
  1366. Bolivian
  1367. Brazilian
  1368. Chilean
  1369. Colombian
  1370. Costa Rican
  1371. Ecuadorian
  1372. Guatemalan
  1373. Hispanic
  1374. Honduran
  1375. Maya
  1376. Mexican
  1377. Nicaraguan
  1378. Panamanian
  1379. Paraguayan
  1380. Peruvian
  1381. Salvadorean
  1382. Uruguayan
  1383. Venezuelan
  1384. Latin, Central or South American, n.i.e. Footnote 1384
  1385. European origins
  1386. Western European origins
  1387. Austrian
  1388. Belgian
  1389. Dutch (Netherlands)
  1390. Flemish
  1391. Frisian
  1392. German
  1393. Luxembourger
  1394. Swiss
  1395. Northern European origins
  1396. Finnish
  1397. Scandinavian origins
  1398. Danish
  1399. Icelandic
  1400. Norwegian
  1401. Swedish
  1402. Scandinavian, n.i.e. Footnote 1402
  1403. Eastern European origins
  1404. Baltic origins
  1405. Estonian
  1406. Latvian
  1407. Lithuanian
  1408. Byelorussian
  1409. Czech and Slovak origins
  1410. Czech
  1411. Czechoslovakian
  1412. Slovak
  1413. Hungarian (Magyar)
  1414. Polish
  1415. Romanian
  1416. Russian
  1417. Ukrainian
  1418. Southern European origins
  1419. Albanian
  1420. Bosnian
  1421. Bulgarian
  1422. Croatian
  1423. Cypriot
  1424. Greek
  1425. Italian
  1426. Kosovar
  1427. Macedonian
  1428. Maltese
  1429. Montenegrin
  1430. Portuguese
  1431. Serbian
  1432. Sicilian
  1433. Slovenian
  1434. Spanish
  1435. Yugoslav, n.i.e. Footnote 1435
  1436. Other European origins
  1437. Basque
  1438. Gypsy (Roma)
  1439. Jewish
  1440. Slav (European)
  1441. European, n.i.e. Footnote 1441
  1442. African origins
  1443. Afrikaner
  1444. Akan
  1445. Amhara
  1446. Angolan
  1447. Ashanti
  1448. Bantu
  1449. Black
  1450. Burundian
  1451. Cameroonian
  1452. Chadian
  1453. Congolese (Zairian)
  1454. Congolese, n.o.s. Footnote 1454
  1455. Dinka
  1456. East African
  1457. Eritrean
  1458. Ethiopian
  1459. Gabonese
  1460. Gambian
  1461. Ghanaian
  1462. Guinean, n.o.s. Footnote 1462
  1463. Harari
  1464. Ibo
  1465. Ivorian
  1466. Kenyan
  1467. Malagasy
  1468. Malian
  1469. Mauritian
  1470. Nigerian
  1471. Oromo
  1472. Peulh
  1473. Rwandan
  1474. Senegalese
  1475. Seychellois
  1476. Sierra Leonean
  1477. Somali
  1478. South African
  1479. Sudanese
  1480. Tanzanian
  1481. Tigrian
  1482. Togolese
  1483. Ugandan
  1484. Yoruba
  1485. Zambian
  1486. Zimbabwean
  1487. Zulu
  1488. African, n.i.e. Footnote 1488
  1489. Arab origins
  1490. Egyptian
  1491. Iraqi
  1492. Jordanian
  1493. Kuwaiti
  1494. Lebanese
  1495. Libyan
  1496. Maghrebi origins
  1497. Algerian
  1498. Berber
  1499. Moroccan
  1500. Tunisian
  1501. Maghrebi, n.i.e. Footnote 1501
  1502. Palestinian
  1503. Saudi Arabian
  1504. Syrian
  1505. Yemeni
  1506. Arab, n.i.e. Footnote 1506
  1507. West Asian origins
  1508. Afghan
  1509. Armenian
  1510. Assyrian
  1511. Azerbaijani
  1512. Georgian
  1513. Iranian
  1514. Israeli
  1515. Kurd
  1516. Pashtun
  1517. Tatar
  1518. Turk
  1519. West Asian, n.i.e. Footnote 1519
  1520. South Asian origins
  1521. Bangladeshi
  1522. Bengali
  1523. East Indian
  1524. Goan
  1525. Gujarati
  1526. Kashmiri
  1527. Nepali
  1528. Pakistani
  1529. Punjabi
  1530. Sinhalese
  1531. Sri Lankan
  1532. Tamil
  1533. South Asian, n.i.e. Footnote 1533
  1534. East and Southeast Asian origins
  1535. Burmese
  1536. Cambodian
  1537. Chinese
  1538. Filipino
  1539. Hmong
  1540. Indonesian
  1541. Japanese
  1542. Khmer
  1543. Korean
  1544. Laotian
  1545. Malaysian
  1546. Mongolian
  1547. Singaporean
  1548. Taiwanese
  1549. Thai
  1550. Tibetan
  1551. Vietnamese
  1552. East or Southeast Asian, n.i.e. Footnote 1552
  1553. Asian, n.o.s. Footnote 1553
  1554. Oceania origins
  1555. Australian
  1556. New Zealander
  1557. Pacific Islands origins
  1558. Fijian
  1559. Hawaiian
  1560. Maori
  1561. Polynesian
  1562. Samoan
  1563. Pacific Islander, n.i.e. Footnote 1563
  1564. Total income in 2005 of population 15 years and over - 20% sample data Footnote 1564
  1565. Without income
  1566. With income
  1567. Under $1,000 Footnote 1567
  1568. $1,000 to $2,999
  1569. $3,000 to $4,999
  1570. $5,000 to $6,999
  1571. $7,000 to $9,999
  1572. $10,000 to $11,999
  1573. $12,000 to $14,999
  1574. $15,000 to $19,999
  1575. $20,000 to $24,999
  1576. $25,000 to $29,999
  1577. $30,000 to $34,999
  1578. $35,000 to $39,999
  1579. $40,000 to $44,999
  1580. $45,000 to $49,999
  1581. $50,000 to $59,999
  1582. $60,000 and over
  1583. Median income $ Footnote 1583
  1584. Average income $ Footnote 1584
  1585. Standard error of average income $ Footnote 1585
  1586. Total income in 2005 of males 15 years and over Footnote 1586
  1587. Without income
  1588. With income
  1589. Under $1,000 Footnote 1589
  1590. $1,000 to $2,999
  1591. $3,000 to $4,999
  1592. $5,000 to $6,999
  1593. $7,000 to $9,999
  1594. $10,000 to $11,999
  1595. $12,000 to $14,999
  1596. $15,000 to $19,999
  1597. $20,000 to $24,999
  1598. $25,000 to $29,999
  1599. $30,000 to $34,999
  1600. $35,000 to $39,999
  1601. $40,000 to $44,999
  1602. $45,000 to $49,999
  1603. $50,000 to $59,999
  1604. $60,000 and over
  1605. Median income $ Footnote 1605
  1606. Average income $ Footnote 1606
  1607. Standard error of average income $ Footnote 1607
  1608. Total income in 2005 of females 15 years and over Footnote 1608
  1609. Without income
  1610. With income
  1611. Under $1,000 Footnote 1611
  1612. $1,000 to $2,999
  1613. $3,000 to $4,999
  1614. $5,000 to $6,999
  1615. $7,000 to $9,999
  1616. $10,000 to $11,999
  1617. $12,000 to $14,999
  1618. $15,000 to $19,999
  1619. $20,000 to $24,999
  1620. $25,000 to $29,999
  1621. $30,000 to $34,999
  1622. $35,000 to $39,999
  1623. $40,000 to $44,999
  1624. $45,000 to $49,999
  1625. $50,000 to $59,999
  1626. $60,000 and over
  1627. Median income $ Footnote 1627
  1628. Average income $ Footnote 1628
  1629. Standard error of average income $ Footnote 1629
  1630. Total after-tax income in 2005 of population 15 years and over - 20% sample data Footnote 1630
  1631. Without after-tax income
  1632. With after-tax income
  1633. Under $1,000 Footnote 1633
  1634. $1,000 to $2,999
  1635. $3,000 to $4,999
  1636. $5,000 to $6,999
  1637. $7,000 to $9,999
  1638. $10,000 to $11,999
  1639. $12,000 to $14,999
  1640. $15,000 to $19,999
  1641. $20,000 to $24,999
  1642. $25,000 to $29,999
  1643. $30,000 to $34,999
  1644. $35,000 to $39,999
  1645. $40,000 to $44,999
  1646. $45,000 to $49,999
  1647. $50,000 and over
  1648. Median after-tax income $ Footnote 1648
  1649. Average after-tax income $ Footnote 1649
  1650. Standard error of average after-tax income $ Footnote 1650
  1651. After-tax income in 2005 of males 15 years and over Footnote 1651
  1652. Without after-tax income
  1653. With after-tax income
  1654. Under $1,000 Footnote 1654
  1655. $1,000 to $2,999
  1656. $3,000 to $4,999
  1657. $5,000 to $6,999
  1658. $7,000 to $9,999
  1659. $10,000 to $11,999
  1660. $12,000 to $14,999
  1661. $15,000 to $19,999
  1662. $20,000 to $24,999
  1663. $25,000 to $29,999
  1664. $30,000 to $34,999
  1665. $35,000 to $39,999
  1666. $40,000 to $44,999
  1667. $45,000 to $49,999
  1668. $50,000 and over
  1669. Median after-tax income $ Footnote 1669
  1670. Average after-tax income $ Footnote 1670
  1671. Standard error of average after-tax income $ Footnote 1671
  1672. After-tax income in 2005 of females 15 years and over Footnote 1672
  1673. Without after-tax income
  1674. With after-tax income
  1675. Under $1,000 Footnote 1675
  1676. $1,000 to $2,999
  1677. $3,000 to $4,999
  1678. $5,000 to $6,999
  1679. $7,000 to $9,999
  1680. $10,000 to $11,999
  1681. $12,000 to $14,999
  1682. $15,000 to $19,999
  1683. $20,000 to $24,999
  1684. $25,000 to $29,999
  1685. $30,000 to $34,999
  1686. $35,000 to $39,999
  1687. $40,000 to $44,999
  1688. $45,000 to $49,999
  1689. $50,000 and over
  1690. Median after-tax income $ Footnote 1690
  1691. Average after-tax income $ Footnote 1691
  1692. Standard error of average after-tax income $ Footnote 1692
  1693. Total population 15 years and over with employment income - 20% sample data Footnote 1693
  1694. Median employment income in 2005 $
  1695. Average employment income in 2005 $
  1696. Standard error of average employment income $
  1697. Worked full year, full time Footnote 1697
  1698. Median employment income in 2005 $
  1699. Average employment income in 2005 $
  1700. Standard error of average employment income $
  1701. Worked part year or part time Footnote 1701
  1702. Median employment income in 2005 $
  1703. Average employment income in 2005 $
  1704. Standard error of average employment income $
  1705. Males 15 years and over with employment income Footnote 1705
  1706. Median employment income in 2005 $
  1707. Average employment income in 2005 $
  1708. Standard error of average employment income $
  1709. Worked full year, full time Footnote 1709
  1710. Median employment income in 2005 $
  1711. Average employment income in 2005 $
  1712. Standard error of average employment income $
  1713. Worked part year or part time Footnote 1713
  1714. Median employment income in 2005 $
  1715. Average employment income in 2005 $
  1716. Standard error of average employment income $
  1717. Females 15 years and over with employment income Footnote 1717
  1718. Median employment income in 2005 $
  1719. Average employment income in 2005 $
  1720. Standard error of average employment income $
  1721. Worked full year, full time Footnote 1721
  1722. Median employment income in 2005 $
  1723. Average employment income in 2005 $
  1724. Standard error of average employment income $
  1725. Worked part year or part time Footnote 1725
  1726. Median employment income in 2005 $
  1727. Average employment income in 2005 $
  1728. Standard error of average employment income $
  1729. Family income in 2005 of economic families - 20% sample data Footnote 1729
  1730. Under $10,000
  1731. $10,000 to $19,999
  1732. $20,000 to $29,999
  1733. $30,000 to $39,999
  1734. $40,000 to $49,999
  1735. $50,000 to $59,999
  1736. $60,000 to $69,999
  1737. $70,000 to $79,999
  1738. $80,000 to $89,999
  1739. $90,000 to $99,999
  1740. $100,000 and over
  1741. Median family income $
  1742. Average family income $
  1743. Standard error of average family income $
  1744. Family income in 2005 of couple economic families Footnote 1744
  1745. Under $10,000
  1746. $10,000 to $19,999
  1747. $20,000 to $29,999
  1748. $30,000 to $39,999
  1749. $40,000 to $49,999
  1750. $50,000 to $59,999
  1751. $60,000 to $69,999
  1752. $70,000 to $79,999
  1753. $80,000 to $89,999
  1754. $90,000 to $99,999
  1755. $100,000 and over
  1756. Median family income $
  1757. Average family income $
  1758. Standard error of average family income $
  1759. Composition of family income in 2005 for all economic families % - 20% sample data Footnote 1759
  1760. Employment income %
  1761. Government transfer payments %
  1762. Other %
  1763. Composition of family income in 2005 for all couple economic families % Footnote 1763
  1764. Employment income %
  1765. Government transfer payments %
  1766. Other %
  1767. Composition of family income in 2005 for all male lone-parent economic families % Footnote 1767
  1768. Employment income %
  1769. Government transfer payments %
  1770. Other %
  1771. Composition of family income in 2005 for all female lone-parent economic families % Footnote 1771
  1772. Employment income %
  1773. Government transfer payments %
  1774. Other %
  1775. After-tax income in 2005 of economic families - 20% sample data Footnote 1775
  1776. Under $10,000
  1777. $10,000 to $19,999
  1778. $20,000 to $29,999
  1779. $30,000 to $39,999
  1780. $40,000 to $49,999
  1781. $50,000 to $59,999
  1782. $60,000 to $69,999
  1783. $70,000 to $79,999
  1784. $80,000 and over
  1785. Median after-tax family income $
  1786. Average after-tax family income $
  1787. Standard error of average after-tax family income $
  1788. After-tax income in 2005 of couple economic families Footnote 1788
  1789. Under $10,000
  1790. $10,000 to $19,999
  1791. $20,000 to $29,999
  1792. $30,000 to $39,999
  1793. $40,000 to $49,999
  1794. $50,000 to $59,999
  1795. $60,000 to $69,999
  1796. $70,000 to $79,999
  1797. $80,000 and over
  1798. Median after-tax family income $
  1799. Average after-tax family income $
  1800. Standard error of average after-tax family income $
  1801. Family income in 2005 of all economic families - 20% sample data Footnote 1801
  1802. Median family income $
  1803. Average family income $
  1804. Standard error of average family income $
  1805. Median after-tax family income $
  1806. Average after-tax family income $
  1807. Standard error of average after-tax family income $
  1808. Family income in 2005 of couple economic families Footnote 1808
  1809. Median family income $
  1810. Average family income $
  1811. Standard error of average family income $
  1812. Median after-tax family income $
  1813. Average after-tax family income $
  1814. Standard error of average after-tax family income $
  1815. Family income in 2005 of male lone-parent economic families Footnote 1815
  1816. Median family income $
  1817. Average family income $
  1818. Standard error of average family income $
  1819. Median after-tax family income $
  1820. Average after-tax family income $
  1821. Standard error of average after-tax family income $
  1822. Family income in 2005 of female lone-parent economic families Footnote 1822
  1823. Median family income $
  1824. Average family income $
  1825. Standard error of average family income $
  1826. Median after-tax family income $
  1827. Average after-tax family income $
  1828. Standard error of average after-tax family income $
  1829. Total income in 2005 of persons 15 years and over not in economic families - 20% sample data Footnote 1829
  1830. Under $1,000
  1831. $1,000 to $2,999
  1832. $3,000 to $4,999
  1833. $5,000 to $6,999
  1834. $7,000 to $9,999
  1835. $10,000 to $11,999
  1836. $12,000 to $14,999
  1837. $15,000 to $19,999
  1838. $20,000 to $24,999
  1839. $25,000 to $29,999
  1840. $30,000 to $34,999
  1841. $35,000 to $39,999
  1842. $40,000 to $44,999
  1843. $45,000 to $49,999
  1844. $50,000 to $59,999
  1845. $60,000 and over
  1846. Median income $
  1847. Average income $
  1848. Standard error of average income $
  1849. Total income in 2005 of males 15 years and over not in economic families Footnote 1849
  1850. Under $1,000
  1851. $1,000 to $2,999
  1852. $3,000 to $4,999
  1853. $5,000 to $6,999
  1854. $7,000 to $9,999
  1855. $10,000 to $11,999
  1856. $12,000 to $14,999
  1857. $15,000 to $19,999
  1858. $20,000 to $24,999
  1859. $25,000 to $29,999
  1860. $30,000 to $34,999
  1861. $35,000 to $39,999
  1862. $40,000 to $44,999
  1863. $45,000 to $49,999
  1864. $50,000 to $59,999
  1865. $60,000 and over
  1866. Median income $
  1867. Average income $
  1868. Standard error of average income $
  1869. Total income in 2005 of females 15 years and over not in economic families Footnote 1869
  1870. Under $1,000
  1871. $1,000 to $2,999
  1872. $3,000 to $4,999
  1873. $5,000 to $6,999
  1874. $7,000 to $9,999
  1875. $10,000 to $11,999
  1876. $12,000 to $14,999
  1877. $15,000 to $19,999
  1878. $20,000 to $24,999
  1879. $25,000 to $29,999
  1880. $30,000 to $34,999
  1881. $35,000 to $39,999
  1882. $40,000 to $44,999
  1883. $45,000 to $49,999
  1884. $50,000 to $59,999
  1885. $60,000 and over
  1886. Median income $
  1887. Average income $
  1888. Standard error of average income $
  1889. Composition of income in 2005 for persons 15 years and over not in economic families % - 20% sample data Footnote 1889
  1890. Employment income %
  1891. Government transfer payments %
  1892. Other %
  1893. Composition of income in 2005 for males 15 years and over not in economic families % Footnote 1893
  1894. Employment income %
  1895. Government transfer payments %
  1896. Other %
  1897. Composition of income in 2005 for females 15 years and over not in economic families % Footnote 1897
  1898. Employment income %
  1899. Government transfer payments %
  1900. Other %
  1901. After-tax income in 2005 of persons 15 years and over not in economic families - 20% sample data Footnote 1901
  1902. Under $1,000
  1903. $1,000 to $2,999
  1904. $3,000 to $4,999
  1905. $5,000 to $6,999
  1906. $7,000 to $9,999
  1907. $10,000 to $11,999
  1908. $12,000 to $14,999
  1909. $15,000 to $19,999
  1910. $20,000 to $24,999
  1911. $25,000 to $29,999
  1912. $30,000 to $34,999
  1913. $35,000 to $39,999
  1914. $40,000 to $44,999
  1915. $45,000 to $49,999
  1916. $50,000 and over
  1917. Median after-tax income $
  1918. Average after-tax income $
  1919. Standard error of average after-tax income $
  1920. After-tax income in 2005 of males 15 years and over not in economic families Footnote 1920
  1921. Under $1,000
  1922. $1,000 to $2,999
  1923. $3,000 to $4,999
  1924. $5,000 to $6,999
  1925. $7,000 to $9,999
  1926. $10,000 to $11,999
  1927. $12,000 to $14,999
  1928. $15,000 to $19,999
  1929. $20,000 to $24,999
  1930. $25,000 to $29,999
  1931. $30,000 to $34,999
  1932. $35,000 to $39,999
  1933. $40,000 to $44,999
  1934. $45,000 to $49,999
  1935. $50,000 and over
  1936. Median after-tax income $
  1937. Average after-tax income $
  1938. Standard error of average after-tax income $
  1939. After-tax income in 2005 of females 15 years and over not in economic families Footnote 1939
  1940. Under $1,000
  1941. $1,000 to $2,999
  1942. $3,000 to $4,999
  1943. $5,000 to $6,999
  1944. $7,000 to $9,999
  1945. $10,000 to $11,999
  1946. $12,000 to $14,999
  1947. $15,000 to $19,999
  1948. $20,000 to $24,999
  1949. $25,000 to $29,999
  1950. $30,000 to $34,999
  1951. $35,000 to $39,999
  1952. $40,000 to $44,999
  1953. $45,000 to $49,999
  1954. $50,000 and over
  1955. Median after-tax income $
  1956. Average after-tax income $
  1957. Standard error of average after-tax income $
  1958. Total economic families - 20% sample data Footnote 1958
  1959. Prevalence of low income before tax in 2005 % Footnote 1959
  1960. Prevalence of low income after tax in 2005 % Footnote 1960
  1961. Couple economic families Footnote 1961
  1962. Prevalence of low income before tax in 2005 % Footnote 1962
  1963. Prevalence of low income after tax in 2005 % Footnote 1963
  1964. Male lone-parent economic families Footnote 1964
  1965. Prevalence of low income before tax in 2005 % Footnote 1965
  1966. Prevalence of low income after tax in 2005 % Footnote 1966
  1967. Female lone-parent economic families Footnote 1967
  1968. Prevalence of low income before tax in 2005 % Footnote 1968
  1969. Prevalence of low income after tax in 2005 % Footnote 1969
  1970. Total persons 15 years and over not in economic families - 20% sample data Footnote 1970
  1971. Prevalence of low income before tax in 2005 % Footnote 1971
  1972. Prevalence of low income after tax in 2005 % Footnote 1972
  1973. Males 15 years and over not in economic families Footnote 1973
  1974. Prevalence of low income before tax in 2005 % Footnote 1974
  1975. Prevalence of low income after tax in 2005 % Footnote 1975
  1976. Females 15 years and over not in economic families Footnote 1976
  1977. Prevalence of low income before tax in 2005 % Footnote 1977
  1978. Prevalence of low income after tax in 2005 % Footnote 1978
  1979. Total persons in private households - 20% sample data Footnote 1979
  1980. Prevalence of low income before tax in 2005 % Footnote 1980
  1981. Prevalence of low income after tax in 2005 % Footnote 1981
  1982. Total persons less than 6 years of age Footnote 1982
  1983. Prevalence of low income before tax in 2005 % Footnote 1983
  1984. Prevalence of low income after tax in 2005 % Footnote 1984
  1985. Total persons 65 years of age and over Footnote 1985
  1986. Prevalence of low income before tax in 2005 % Footnote 1986
  1987. Prevalence of low income after tax in 2005 % Footnote 1987
  1988. Household income in 2005 of private households - 20% sample data Footnote 1988
  1989. Under $10,000
  1990. $10,000 to $19,999
  1991. $20,000 to $29,999
  1992. $30,000 to $39,999
  1993. $40,000 to $49,999
  1994. $50,000 to $59,999
  1995. $60,000 to $69,999
  1996. $70,000 to $79,999
  1997. $80,000 to $89,999
  1998. $90,000 to $99,999
  1999. $100,000 and over
  2000. Median household income $
  2001. Average household income $
  2002. Standard error of average household income $
  2003. Household income in 2005 of one-person private households Footnote 2003
  2004. Under $10,000
  2005. $10,000 to $19,999
  2006. $20,000 to $29,999
  2007. $30,000 to $39,999
  2008. $40,000 to $49,999
  2009. $50,000 to $59,999
  2010. $60,000 to $69,999
  2011. $70,000 to $79,999
  2012. $80,000 to $89,999
  2013. $90,000 to $99,999
  2014. $100,000 and over
  2015. Median household income $
  2016. Average household income $
  2017. Standard error of average household income $
  2018. After-tax income in 2005 of private households - 20% sample data Footnote 2018
  2019. Under $10,000
  2020. $10,000 to $19,999
  2021. $20,000 to $29,999
  2022. $30,000 to $39,999
  2023. $40,000 to $49,999
  2024. $50,000 to $59,999
  2025. $60,000 to $69,999
  2026. $70,000 to $79,999
  2027. $80,000 to $89,999
  2028. $90,000 to $99,999
  2029. $100,000 and over
  2030. Median after-tax household income $
  2031. Average after-tax household income $
  2032. Standard error of average after-tax household income $
  2033. After-tax income in 2005 of one-person private households Footnote 2033
  2034. Under $10,000
  2035. $10,000 to $19,999
  2036. $20,000 to $29,999
  2037. $30,000 to $39,999
  2038. $40,000 to $49,999
  2039. $50,000 to $59,999
  2040. $60,000 to $69,999
  2041. $70,000 to $79,999
  2042. $80,000 to $89,999
  2043. $90,000 to $99,999
  2044. $100,000 and over
  2045. Median after-tax household income $
  2046. Average after-tax household income $
  2047. Standard error of average after-tax household income $
  2048. Total number of non-farm, non-reserve private dwellings occupied by usual residents - 20% sample data Footnote 2048
  2049. Tenant-occupied private non-farm, non-reserve dwellings
  2050. Average gross rent $ Footnote 2050
  2051. Tenant-occupied households spending 30% or more of household income on gross rent Footnote 2051
  2052. Tenant-occupied households spending from 30% to 99% of household income on gross rent
  2053. Owner-occupied private non-farm, non-reserve dwellings
  2054. Average value of dwelling $ Footnote 2054
  2055. Average owner major payments $ Footnote 2055
  2056. Owner households spending 30% or more of household income on owner's major payments Footnote 2056
  2057. Owner households spending 30% to 99% of household income on owner's major payments
  2058. Tenant one-family households without additional persons in non-farm, non-reserve private dwellings occupied by usual residents Footnote 2058
  2059. Average gross rent $ Footnote 2059
  2060. Tenant one-family households without additional persons spending 30% or more of household income on shelter costs Footnote 2060
  2061. Owner one-family households without additional persons in non-farm, non-reserve private dwellings occupied by usual residents
  2062. Average owner major payments $ Footnote 2062
  2063. Owner one-family households without additional persons spending 30% or more of household income on shelter costs Footnote 2063
  2064. Total population by immigrant status and place of birth - 20% sample data
  2065. Non-immigrant population Footnote 2065
  2066. Born in province of residence
  2067. Born outside province of residence
  2068. Total immigrants by selected places of birth Footnote 2068
  2069. United Kingdom
  2070. China, People's Republic of
  2071. India
  2072. Philippines
  2073. Italy
  2074. United States of America
  2075. Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region
  2076. Germany
  2077. Poland
  2078. Viet Nam
  2079. Portugal
  2080. Pakistan
  2081. Jamaica
  2082. Netherlands
  2083. Sri Lanka
  2084. Korea, South
  2085. Iran
  2086. Guyana
  2087. Romania
  2088. France
  2089. Lebanon
  2090. Greece
  2091. Trinidad and Tobago
  2092. Taiwan
  2093. Russian Federation
  2094. Haiti
  2095. Ukraine
  2096. Mexico
  2097. Hungary
  2098. El Salvador
  2099. Egypt
  2100. Croatia
  2101. Colombia
  2102. Morocco
  2103. South Africa, Republic of
  2104. Yugoslavia, n.o.s. Footnote 2104
  2105. Afghanistan
  2106. Iraq
  2107. Bangladesh
  2108. Algeria
  2109. Bosnia and Herzegovina
  2110. Chile
  2111. Serbia and Montenegro
  2112. Fiji
  2113. Kenya
  2114. Ireland (Eire)
  2115. Peru
  2116. Czech Republic
  2117. Malaysia
  2118. Japan
  2119. Israel
  2120. Austria
  2121. Belgium
  2122. Cambodia
  2123. Switzerland
  2124. Other country Footnote 2124
  2125. Non-permanent residents Footnote 2125
  2126. Total recent immigrants by selected places of birth - 20% sample data Footnote 2126
  2127. China, People's Republic of
  2128. India
  2129. Philippines
  2130. Pakistan
  2131. United States of America
  2132. Korea, South
  2133. Romania
  2134. Iran
  2135. United Kingdom
  2136. Colombia
  2137. Sri Lanka
  2138. Russian Federation
  2139. France
  2140. Mexico
  2141. Afghanistan
  2142. Algeria
  2143. Ukraine
  2144. Morocco
  2145. Bangladesh
  2146. Lebanon
  2147. Taiwan
  2148. Haiti
  2149. Viet Nam
  2150. Iraq
  2151. Jamaica
  2152. Bulgaria
  2153. Germany
  2154. Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region
  2155. Nigeria
  2156. Guyana
  2157. Congo, Democratic Republic of the
  2158. Egypt
  2159. Ethiopia
  2160. South Africa, Republic of
  2161. Poland
  2162. Sudan
  2163. Argentina
  2164. Japan
  2165. Albania
  2166. Peru
  2167. Brazil
  2168. Israel
  2169. Serbia and Montenegro
  2170. Syria
  2171. Saudi Arabia
  2172. All other places of birth

Footnotes

Footnote 1

These figures have not been subjected to random rounding.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Includes institutional residents.

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 41

Includes institutional residents.

Legal marital status
Part A - Plain language definition
A person's conjugal status under the law (e.g., single, married, widowed). Legal marital status data are derived from the responses to Question 4 (Marital status) in the census questionnaires.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the legal conjugal status of a person. The various responses are defined as follows:
Never legally married (single) - Persons who have never married (including all persons less than 15 years of age) and persons whose marriage has been annulled and who have not remarried.
Legally married (and not separated) - Persons whose spouse is living, unless the couple is separated or a divorce has been obtained.
Separated, but still legally married - Persons currently married, but who are no longer living with their spouse (for any reason other than illness or work) and have not obtained a divorce.
Divorced - Persons who have obtained a legal divorce and who have not remarried.
Widowed - Persons who have lost their spouse through death and who have not remarried.

Return to footnote 41 referrer

Footnote 43

Since 1996, Aboriginal people married according to traditional customs were instructed to report themselves as legally married.

In 2006, legally married same-sex couples are included in this category.

Return to footnote 43 referrer

Footnote 47

Includes institutional residents.

Common-law status
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who live together as a couple but who are not legally married to each other. These persons can be of the opposite sex or of the same sex.

Return to footnote 47 referrer

Footnote 50

Census family
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to a married couple (with or without children of either or both spouses), a couple living common-law (with or without children of either or both partners) or a lone parent of any marital status, with at least one child living in the same dwelling. A couple may be of opposite or same sex. 'Children' in a census family include grandchildren living with their grandparent(s) but with no parents present.

Return to footnote 50 referrer

Footnote 55

Census family structure
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the classification of census families into married couples (with or without children of either or both spouses), common-law couples (with or without children of either or both partners), and lone-parent families by sex of parent. A couple may be of opposite or same sex. 'Children' in a census family include grandchildren living with their grandparent(s) but with no parents present.

Return to footnote 55 referrer

Footnote 78

Refers to the persons who are sons and daughters in census families.

Return to footnote 78 referrer

Footnote 84

The average number of children at home per census family is calculated using the total number of children at home and the total number of census families.

Return to footnote 84 referrer

Footnote 87

Non-relatives may be present.

Return to footnote 87 referrer

Footnote 94

Non-relatives may be present.

Return to footnote 94 referrer

Footnote 98

Dwelling, occupied private
Part A - Plain language definition
A separate set of living quarters which has a private entrance either directly from outside or from a common hall, lobby, vestibule or stairway leading to the outside, and in which a person or a group of persons live permanently.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to a private dwelling in which a person or a group of persons is permanently residing. Also included are private dwellings whose usual residents are temporarily absent on Census Day. Unless otherwise specified, all data in housing products are for occupied private dwellings, rather than for unoccupied private dwellings or dwellings occupied solely by foreign and/or temporary residents.

Return to footnote 98 referrer

Footnote 99

Rooms
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of rooms in a dwelling. A room is an enclosed area within a dwelling which is finished and suitable for year-round living.

Return to footnote 99 referrer

Footnote 100

Bedrooms
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to all rooms designed and furnished as bedrooms and used mainly for sleeping purposes, even though the use may be occasional (e.g., spare bedroom).

Return to footnote 100 referrer

Footnote 101

Tenure
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to whether some member of the household owns or rents the dwelling, or whether the dwelling is Band housing (on an Indian reserve or settlement).

Return to footnote 101 referrer

Footnote 105

Condition of dwelling
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to whether, in the judgment of the respondent, the dwelling requires any repairs (excluding desirable remodeling or additions).

Return to footnote 105 referrer

Footnote 109

Period of construction
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the period in time during which the building or dwelling was originally constructed.

Return to footnote 109 referrer

Footnote 118

Includes data up to May 16, 2006.

Return to footnote 118 referrer

Footnote 119

Structural type of dwelling
Part A - Plain language definition
Characteristics that define a dwelling's structure, for example, the characteristics of a single-detached house, a semi-detached house, a row house, or an apartment or flat in a duplex.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the structural characteristics and/or dwelling configuration, that is, whether the dwelling is a single-detached house, an apartment in a high-rise building, a row house, a mobile home, etc.

In 2006, improvements to the enumeration process and changes in structural type classification affect the historical comparability of the 'structural type of dwelling' variable. In 2006, 'apartment or flat in a duplex' replaces 'apartment or flat in a detached duplex' and includes duplexes attached to other dwellings or buildings. This is a change from the 2001 Census where duplexes attached to other dwellings or buildings were classified as an 'apartment in a building that has fewer than five storeys'.

Return to footnote 119 referrer

Footnote 127

Includes mobile homes and other movable dwellings such as houseboats and railroad cars.

Return to footnote 127 referrer

Footnote 128

Household, private
Part A - Plain language definition
Person or group of persons occupying the same dwelling.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.

Household size
Part A - Plain language definition
Number of persons occupying a private dwelling.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons in a private household.

Return to footnote 128 referrer

Footnote 136

Household type
Part A - Plain language definition
Category to which a person living alone or a group of persons occupying the same dwelling belong. There are two categories: non-family households and family households.

A non-family household consists either of one person living alone or of two or more persons who share a dwelling, but do not constitute a family.

Family households are divided into two subcategories: one-family households and multiple-family households.

A one-family household consists of a single family (e.g., a couple with or without children). A multiple-family household is made up of two or more families occupying the same dwelling.

Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the basic division of private households into family and non-family households. Family household refers to a household that contains at least one census family, that is, a married couple with or without children, or a couple living common-law with or without children, or a lone parent living with one or more children (lone-parent family). One-family household refers to a single census family (with or without other persons) that occupies a private dwelling. Multiple-family household refers to a household in which two or more census families (with or without additional persons) occupy the same private dwelling.

Non-family household refers to either one person living alone in a private dwelling or to a group of two or more people who share a private dwelling, but who do not constitute a census family.

Return to footnote 136 referrer

Footnote 140

Mother tongue
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood by the individual at the time of the census.

Return to footnote 140 referrer

Footnote 224

The 2006 category 'Chinese, n.o.s.' includes responses of 'Chinese' as well as all Chinese languages other than Cantonese, Mandarin, Taiwanese, Chaochow (Teochow), Fukien, Hakka and Shanghainese. Data for the 'Chinese, n.o.s.' category in 2001 and 2006 are not directly comparable. The 2001 category 'Chinese, n.o.s.' is equivalent to the sum of the 2006 categories 'Chinese, n.o.s.' and 'Chaochow (Teochow),' 'Fukien,' 'Shanghainese' and 'Taiwanese.'

Return to footnote 224 referrer

Footnote 237

This is a subtotal of all languages collected by the census that are not displayed separately here. For a full list of languages collected in the census, please refer to Appendix G in the 2006 Census Dictionary.

Return to footnote 237 referrer

Footnote 243

Knowledge of official languages
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the ability to conduct a conversation in English only, in French only, in both English and French, or in neither English nor French.

Data on knowledge of official languages

According to studies on data certification, the 2006 Census statistics on knowledge of official languages could underestimate the category 'English and French' and overestimate the category 'French only,' particularly for the francophone population, but also for the whole population in general. More information on the subject will be available in the Languages Reference Guide, to be published in 2008.

Return to footnote 243 referrer

Footnote 248

First official language spoken
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to a variable specified within the framework of the Official Languages Act.

Data on knowledge of official languages

According to studies on data certification, the 2006 Census statistics on knowledge of official languages could underestimate the category 'English and French' and overestimate the category 'French only,' particularly for the francophone population, but also for the whole population in general. More information on the subject will be available in the Languages Reference Guide, to be published in 2008.

Return to footnote 248 referrer

Footnote 253

The official language minority is English in Quebec and French in all other provinces and territories.

Return to footnote 253 referrer

Footnote 254

The official language minority is English in Quebec and French in all other provinces and territories.

Return to footnote 254 referrer

Footnote 255

Refers to the language spoken most often at home by the individual at the time of the census. Other languages spoken at home on a regular basis are also collected.

Return to footnote 255 referrer

Footnote 339

The 2006 category 'Chinese, n.o.s.' includes responses of 'Chinese' as well as all Chinese languages other than Cantonese, Mandarin, Taiwanese, Chaochow (Teochow), Fukien, Hakka and Shanghainese. Data for the 'Chinese, n.o.s.' category in 2001 and 2006 are not directly comparable. The 2001 category 'Chinese, n.o.s.' is equivalent to the sum of the 2006 categories 'Chinese, n.o.s.' and 'Chaochow (Teochow),' 'Fukien,' 'Shanghainese' and 'Taiwanese.'

Return to footnote 339 referrer

Footnote 352

This is a subtotal of all languages collected by the census that are not displayed separately here. For a full list of languages collected in the census, please refer to Appendix G in the 2006 Census Dictionary.

Return to footnote 352 referrer

Footnote 358

Knowledge of non-official languages
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to languages, other than English or French, in which the respondent can conduct a conversation.

Return to footnote 358 referrer

Footnote 437

The 2006 category 'Chinese, n.o.s.' includes responses of 'Chinese' as well as all Chinese languages other than Cantonese, Mandarin, Taiwanese, Chaochow (Teochow), Fukien, Hakka and Shanghainese. Data for the 'Chinese, n.o.s.' category in 2001 and 2006 are not directly comparable. The 2001 category 'Chinese, n.o.s.' is equivalent to the sum of the 2006 categories 'Chinese, n.o.s.' and 'Chaochow (Teochow),' 'Fukien,' 'Shanghainese' and 'Taiwanese.'

Return to footnote 437 referrer

Footnote 450

This is a subtotal of all languages collected by the census that are not displayed separately here. For a full list of languages collected in the census, please refer to Appendix G in the 2006 Census Dictionary.

Return to footnote 450 referrer

Footnote 451

Refers to the relationship between a person's usual place of residence on Census Day and his or her usual place of residence one year earlier. A person is classified as a non-mover if no difference exists. Otherwise, a person is classified as a mover and this categorization is called Mobility status (1 year ago). Within the category of movers, a further distinction is made between non-migrants and migrants; this difference is called migration status.

Non-movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at the same address as the one at which they resided one year earlier.

Movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at a different address from the one at which they resided one year earlier.

Non-migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living at a different address, but in the same census subdivision (CSD) as the one they lived in one year earlier.

Migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were residing in a different CSD one year earlier (internal migrants) or who were living outside Canada one year earlier (external migrants).

Intraprovincial migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living in a different CSD from the one at which they resided one year earlier, in the same province.

Interprovincial migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living in a different CSD from the one at which they resided one year earlier, in a different province.

Return to footnote 451 referrer

Footnote 460

Refers to the relationship between a person's usual place of residence on Census Day and his or her usual place of residence five years earlier. A person is classified as a non-mover if no difference exists. Otherwise, a person is classified as a mover and this categorization is called Mobility status (5 years ago). Within the category of movers, a further distinction is made between non-migrants and migrants; this difference is called migration status.

Non-movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at the same address as the one at which they resided five years earlier.

Movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at a different address from the one at which they resided five years earlier.

Non-migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living at a different address, but in the same census subdivision (CSD) as the one they lived in five years earlier.

Migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were residing in a different CSD five years earlier (internal migrants) or who were living outside Canada five years earlier (external migrants).

Intraprovincial migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living in a different CSD from the one in which they resided five years earlier, in the same province.

Interprovincial migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living in a different CSD from the one in which they resided five years earlier, in a different province.

Return to footnote 460 referrer

Footnote 469

Citizenship
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the legal citizenship status of the respondent. Persons who are citizens of more than one country were instructed to provide the name of the other country(ies).

Includes persons who are stateless.

Return to footnote 469 referrer

Footnote 473

Includes persons who are stateless. Prior to the 2006 Census, this category was called 'Citizens of other countries'. The content of the category remains unchanged in 2006 compared with previous censuses.

Return to footnote 473 referrer

Footnote 474

For information on the specific countries included in each regional grouping in this variable, please refer to Appendix J in the 2006 Census Dictionary.

Return to footnote 474 referrer

Footnote 475

Non-immigrants are persons who are Canadian citizens by birth. Although most Canadian citizens by birth were born in Canada, a small number were born outside Canada to Canadian parents.

Return to footnote 475 referrer

Footnote 478

Immigrants are persons who are, or have ever been, landed immigrants in Canada. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others are recent arrivals. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number were born in Canada. Includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to Census Day, May 16, 2006.

Return to footnote 478 referrer

Footnote 510

'Other' includes Greenland, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, the category 'Other country,' as well as immigrants born in Canada.

Return to footnote 510 referrer

Footnote 511

Non-permanent residents are persons from another country who, at the time of the census, held a Work or Study Permit or who were refugee claimants, as well as family members living with them in Canada.

Return to footnote 511 referrer

Footnote 512

In this product, recent immigrants are immigrants who landed in Canada between January 1, 2001 and Census Day, May 16, 2006.

Immigrants are persons who are, or have ever been, landed immigrants in Canada. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others are recent arrivals. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number were born in Canada. Includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to Census Day, May 16, 2006.

For information on the specific countries included in each regional grouping in this variable, please refer to Appendix J in the 2006 Census Dictionary.

Return to footnote 512 referrer

Footnote 544

'Other' includes Greenland, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, the category 'Other country,' as well as immigrants born in Canada.

Return to footnote 544 referrer

Footnote 545

Period of immigration
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to ranges of years based on the year of immigration question. Year of immigration refers to the year in which landed immigrant status was first obtained. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities.

Immigrants are persons who are, or have ever been, landed immigrants in Canada. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others are recent arrivals. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number were born in Canada. Includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to Census Day, May 16, 2006.

Return to footnote 545 referrer

Footnote 553

Includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to Census Day, May 16, 2006.

Return to footnote 553 referrer

Footnote 554

Age at immigration
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the age at which the respondent first obtained landed immigrant status. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities.

Immigrant population
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to people who are, or have been, landed immigrants in Canada. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others have arrived recently. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number were born in Canada.

Return to footnote 554 referrer

Footnote 560

Generation status
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the generational status of a person, that is, 1st generation, 2nd generation or 3rd generation or more.

Return to footnote 560 referrer

Footnote 561

Persons born outside Canada. For the most part, these are people who are now, or have ever been, landed immigrants in Canada. Also included in the first generation are a small number of people born outside Canada to parents who are Canadian citizens by birth. In addition, the first generation includes people who are non-permanent residents (defined as people from another country living in Canada on Work or Study Permits or as refugee claimants, and any family members living with them in Canada).

Return to footnote 561 referrer

Footnote 562

Persons born inside Canada with at least one parent born outside Canada. This includes (a) persons born in Canada with both parents born outside Canada and (b) persons born in Canada with one parent born in Canada and one parent born outside Canada (these persons may have grandparents born inside or outside Canada as well).

Return to footnote 562 referrer

Footnote 563

Persons born inside Canada with both parents born inside Canada (these persons may have grandparents born inside or outside Canada as well).

Return to footnote 563 referrer

Footnote 564

Aboriginal identity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to those persons who reported identifying with at least one Aboriginal group, that is, North American Indian, Métis or Inuit, and/or those who reported being a Treaty Indian or a Registered Indian, as defined by the Indian Act of Canada and/or those who reported they were members of an Indian band or First Nation.
In 1991 and previous censuses, the Aboriginal population was defined using the ethnic origin question (ancestry). The 1996 Census included a question on the individual's perception of his/her Aboriginal identity.
The question used in the 2006 and 2001 censuses is the same as the one used in 1996.
This is a grouping of the total population into non-Aboriginal or Aboriginal population, with Aboriginal persons further divided into Aboriginal groups, based on their responses to three questions on the 2006 Census form.

Return to footnote 564 referrer

Footnote 565

Included in the Aboriginal identity population are those persons who reported identifying with at least one Aboriginal group, that is, North American Indian, Métis or Inuit, and/or those who reported being a Treaty Indian or a Registered Indian, as defined by the Indian Act of Canada, and/or those who reported they were members of an Indian band or First Nation.

Return to footnote 565 referrer

Footnote 566

Users should be aware that the counts for this item are more affected than most by the incomplete enumeration of certain Indian reserves and Indian settlements. The extent of the impact will depend on the geographic area under study. In 2006, a total of 22 Indian reserves and Indian settlements were incompletely enumerated by the census. The populations of these 22 communities are not included in the census counts.

Return to footnote 566 referrer

Footnote 570

Includes those who identified themselves as Registered Indians and/or band members without identifying themselves as North American Indian, Métis or Inuit in the Aboriginal identity question.

Return to footnote 570 referrer

Footnote 572

Registered or Treaty Indian
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to those persons who reported they were registered under the Indian Act of Canada. Treaty Indians are persons who are registered under the Indian Act and can prove descent from a band that signed a treaty. Although there was a question in the 1991 Census on registration status, the layout of the 1996 question was somewhat different. In 1991, Question 16 on Registered Indians had two components. In the first part of the question, respondents were asked about their registration status, while the second part of the question dealt with band membership. The question used in 1996 asked only for registration or treaty status, while band membership was dealt with in a separate question.
The wording of the question, starting in 1996, differs slightly from the one in previous censuses. Prior to 1996, the term 'treaty' was not included in the question. It was added in 1996 at the request of individuals from the Western provinces, where the term is more widely used.
The 2006 Census question is the same as the one used in 1996 and 2001.

Return to footnote 572 referrer

Footnote 573

Registered or Treaty Indian: The expression 'Registered Indian' refers to those persons who reported they were registered under the Indian Act of Canada. Treaty Indians are persons who are registered under the Indian Act and can prove descent from a band that signed a treaty.

The Registered Indian counts in this table may differ from the administrative counts maintained by the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, with the most important causes of these differences being the incompletely enumerated Indian reserves and Indian settlements as well as methodological and conceptual differences between the two sources.

Return to footnote 573 referrer

Footnote 575

Age
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 575 referrer

Footnote 576

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 576 referrer

Footnote 577

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 577 referrer

Footnote 578

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 578 referrer

Footnote 579

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 579 referrer

Footnote 580

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 580 referrer

Footnote 581

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 581 referrer

Footnote 582

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 582 referrer

Footnote 583

Age
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 583 referrer

Footnote 584

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 584 referrer

Footnote 585

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 585 referrer

Footnote 586

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 586 referrer

Footnote 587

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 587 referrer

Footnote 588

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 588 referrer

Footnote 589

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 589 referrer

Footnote 590

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 590 referrer

Footnote 591

Age
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 591 referrer

Footnote 592

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 592 referrer

Footnote 593

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 593 referrer

Footnote 594

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 594 referrer

Footnote 595

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 595 referrer

Footnote 596

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 596 referrer

Footnote 597

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 597 referrer

Footnote 598

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 598 referrer

Footnote 599

Age
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 599 referrer

Footnote 600

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 600 referrer

Footnote 601

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 601 referrer

Footnote 602

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 602 referrer

Footnote 603

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 603 referrer

Footnote 604

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 604 referrer

Footnote 605

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 605 referrer

Footnote 606

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 606 referrer

Footnote 607

Age
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 607 referrer

Footnote 608

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 608 referrer

Footnote 609

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 609 referrer

Footnote 610

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 610 referrer

Footnote 611

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 611 referrer

Footnote 612

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 612 referrer

Footnote 613

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 613 referrer

Footnote 614

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 614 referrer

Footnote 615

Age
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 615 referrer

Footnote 616

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 616 referrer

Footnote 617

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 617 referrer

Footnote 618

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 618 referrer

Footnote 619

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 619 referrer

Footnote 620

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 620 referrer

Footnote 621

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 621 referrer

Footnote 622

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 622 referrer

Footnote 623

Age
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 623 referrer

Footnote 624

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 624 referrer

Footnote 625

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 625 referrer

Footnote 626

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 626 referrer

Footnote 627

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 627 referrer

Footnote 628

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 628 referrer

Footnote 629

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 629 referrer

Footnote 630

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 630 referrer

Footnote 631

Age
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 631 referrer

Footnote 632

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 632 referrer

Footnote 633

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 633 referrer

Footnote 634

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 634 referrer

Footnote 635

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 635 referrer

Footnote 636

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 636 referrer

Footnote 637

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 637 referrer

Footnote 638

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 638 referrer

Footnote 639

Age
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 639 referrer

Footnote 640

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 640 referrer

Footnote 641

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 641 referrer

Footnote 642

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 642 referrer

Footnote 643

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 643 referrer

Footnote 644

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 644 referrer

Footnote 645

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 645 referrer

Footnote 646

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 646 referrer

Footnote 647

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 647 referrer

Footnote 648

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 648 referrer

Footnote 649

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 649 referrer

Footnote 650

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 650 referrer

Footnote 651

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 651 referrer

Footnote 652

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 652 referrer

Footnote 653

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 653 referrer

Footnote 654

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 654 referrer

Footnote 655

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 655 referrer

Footnote 656

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 656 referrer

Footnote 657

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 657 referrer

Footnote 658

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 658 referrer

Footnote 659

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 659 referrer

Footnote 660

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 660 referrer

Footnote 661

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 661 referrer

Footnote 662

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 662 referrer

Footnote 663

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 663 referrer

Footnote 664

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 664 referrer

Footnote 665

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 665 referrer

Footnote 666

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 666 referrer

Footnote 667

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 667 referrer

Footnote 668

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 668 referrer

Footnote 669

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 669 referrer

Footnote 670

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 670 referrer

Footnote 671

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 671 referrer

Footnote 672

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 672 referrer

Footnote 673

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 673 referrer

Footnote 674

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 674 referrer

Footnote 675

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 675 referrer

Footnote 676

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 676 referrer

Footnote 677

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 677 referrer

Footnote 678

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 678 referrer

Footnote 679

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 679 referrer

Footnote 680

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 680 referrer

Footnote 681

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 681 referrer

Footnote 682

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 682 referrer

Footnote 683

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 683 referrer

Footnote 684

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 684 referrer

Footnote 685

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 685 referrer

Footnote 686

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 686 referrer

Footnote 687

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 687 referrer

Footnote 688

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 688 referrer

Footnote 689

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 689 referrer

Footnote 690

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 690 referrer

Footnote 691

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 691 referrer

Footnote 692

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 692 referrer

Footnote 693

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 693 referrer

Footnote 694

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 694 referrer

Footnote 695

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 695 referrer

Footnote 696

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 696 referrer

Footnote 697

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 697 referrer

Footnote 698

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 698 referrer

Footnote 699

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 699 referrer

Footnote 700

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 700 referrer

Footnote 701

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 701 referrer

Footnote 702

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 702 referrer

Footnote 703

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 703 referrer

Footnote 704

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 704 referrer

Footnote 705

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 705 referrer

Footnote 706

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 706 referrer

Footnote 707

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 707 referrer

Footnote 708

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 708 referrer

Footnote 709

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 709 referrer

Footnote 710

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 710 referrer

Footnote 711

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 711 referrer

Footnote 712

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 712 referrer

Footnote 713

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 713 referrer

Footnote 714

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 714 referrer

Footnote 715

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 715 referrer

Footnote 716

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 716 referrer

Footnote 717

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 717 referrer

Footnote 718

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 718 referrer

Footnote 719

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 719 referrer

Footnote 720

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 720 referrer

Footnote 721

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 721 referrer

Footnote 722

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 722 referrer

Footnote 723

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 723 referrer

Footnote 724

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 724 referrer

Footnote 725

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 725 referrer

Footnote 726

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 726 referrer

Footnote 727

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 727 referrer

Footnote 728

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 728 referrer

Footnote 729

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 729 referrer

Footnote 730

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 730 referrer

Footnote 731

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 731 referrer

Footnote 732

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 732 referrer

Footnote 733

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 733 referrer

Footnote 734

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 734 referrer

Footnote 735

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 735 referrer

Footnote 736

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 736 referrer

Footnote 737

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 737 referrer

Footnote 738

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 738 referrer

Footnote 739

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 739 referrer

Footnote 740

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 740 referrer

Footnote 741

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 741 referrer

Footnote 742

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 742 referrer

Footnote 743

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 743 referrer

Footnote 744

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 744 referrer

Footnote 745

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 745 referrer

Footnote 746

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 746 referrer

Footnote 747

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 747 referrer

Footnote 748

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 748 referrer

Footnote 749

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 749 referrer

Footnote 750

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 750 referrer

Footnote 751

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 751 referrer

Footnote 752

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 752 referrer

Footnote 753

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 753 referrer

Footnote 754

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 754 referrer

Footnote 755

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 755 referrer

Footnote 756

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 756 referrer

Footnote 757

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 757 referrer

Footnote 758

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 758 referrer

Footnote 759

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 759 referrer

Footnote 760

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 760 referrer

Footnote 761

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 761 referrer

Footnote 762

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 762 referrer

Footnote 763

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 763 referrer

Footnote 764

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 764 referrer

Footnote 765

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 765 referrer

Footnote 766

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 766 referrer

Footnote 767

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 767 referrer

Footnote 768

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 768 referrer

Footnote 769

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 769 referrer

Footnote 770

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 770 referrer

Footnote 771

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 771 referrer

Footnote 772

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 772 referrer

Footnote 773

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 773 referrer

Footnote 774

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 774 referrer

Footnote 775

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 775 referrer

Footnote 776

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 776 referrer

Footnote 777

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 777 referrer

Footnote 778

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 778 referrer

Footnote 779

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 779 referrer

Footnote 780

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 780 referrer

Footnote 781

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 781 referrer

Footnote 782

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 782 referrer

Footnote 783

Sex
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Presence of children
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of children in private households by age groups.

Labour force activity
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). Respondents were classified as Employed, Unemployed, or Not in the labour force. The labour force includes the employed and the unemployed.

Return to footnote 783 referrer

Footnote 784

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 784 referrer

Footnote 785

Employed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006): (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment or without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice; (b) were absent from their job or business, with or without pay, for the entire week because of a vacation, an illness, a labour dispute at their place of work, or any other reasons.

Return to footnote 785 referrer

Footnote 786

Unemployed
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Persons who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were without paid work or without self-employment work and were available for work and either: (a) had actively looked for paid work in the past four weeks; or (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

Return to footnote 786 referrer

Footnote 787

Not in the labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers in an 'off' season who were not looking for work, and persons who could not work because of a long term illness or disability.

Return to footnote 787 referrer

Footnote 788

Participation rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over.

Participation rate = Labour force divided by Population 15 years of age and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 788 referrer

Footnote 789

Employment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006), expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over.

Employment rate = Employed divided by Population 15 years and over (excluding institutional residents) X 100

The employment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, in that group.

Return to footnote 789 referrer

Footnote 790

Unemployment rate
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the unemployed expressed as a percentage of the labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Unemployment rate = Unemployed divided by Labour force X 100

The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

Return to footnote 790 referrer

Footnote 791

Class of worker
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
This variable classifies persons who reported a job into the following categories:

a. persons who worked mainly for wages, salaries, commissions, tips, piece-rates, or payments 'in kind' (payments in goods or services rather than money);
b. persons who worked mainly for themselves, with or without paid help, operating a business, farm or professional practice, alone or in partnership;
c. persons who worked without pay in a family business, farm or professional practice owned or operated by a related household member; unpaid family work does not include unpaid housework, unpaid childcare, unpaid care to seniors and volunteer work.

The job reported was the one held in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 16, 2006) if the person was employed, or the job of longest duration since January 1, 2005, if the person was not employed during the reference week. Persons with two or more jobs in the reference week were asked to provide information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 791 referrer

Footnote 792

Unemployed persons 15 years and over who have never worked for pay or in self-employment or who had last worked prior to January 1, 2005.

Return to footnote 792 referrer

Footnote 793

Refers to the experienced labour force population: includes persons who were employed and persons who were unemployed who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2005.

Return to footnote 793 referrer

Footnote 803

Class of worker
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
This variable classifies persons who reported a job into the following categories:

a. persons who worked mainly for wages, salaries, commissions, tips, piece-rates, or payments 'in kind' (payments in goods or services rather than money);
b. persons who worked mainly for themselves, with or without paid help, operating a business, farm or professional practice, alone or in partnership;
c. persons who worked without pay in a family business, farm or professional practice owned or operated by a related household member; unpaid family work does not include unpaid housework, unpaid childcare, unpaid care to seniors and volunteer work.

The job reported was the one held in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 16, 2006) if the person was employed, or the job of longest duration since January 1, 2005, if the person was not employed during the reference week. Persons with two or more jobs in the reference week were asked to provide information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 803 referrer

Footnote 804

Unemployed persons 15 years and over who have never worked for pay or in self-employment or who had last worked prior to January 1, 2005.

Return to footnote 804 referrer

Footnote 805

Refers to the experienced labour force population: includes persons who were employed and persons who were unemployed who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2005.

Return to footnote 805 referrer

Footnote 815

Class of worker
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
This variable classifies persons who reported a job into the following categories:

a. persons who worked mainly for wages, salaries, commissions, tips, piece-rates, or payments 'in kind' (payments in goods or services rather than money);
b. persons who worked mainly for themselves, with or without paid help, operating a business, farm or professional practice, alone or in partnership;
c. persons who worked without pay in a family business, farm or professional practice owned or operated by a related household member; unpaid family work does not include unpaid housework, unpaid childcare, unpaid care to seniors and volunteer work.

The job reported was the one held in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 16, 2006) if the person was employed, or the job of longest duration since January 1, 2005, if the person was not employed during the reference week. Persons with two or more jobs in the reference week were asked to provide information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 815 referrer

Footnote 816

Unemployed persons 15 years and over who have never worked for pay or in self-employment or who had last worked prior to January 1, 2005.

Return to footnote 816 referrer

Footnote 817

Refers to the experienced labour force population: includes persons who were employed and persons who were unemployed who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2005.

Return to footnote 817 referrer

Footnote 827

Occupation (based on the National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006 [NOC-S 2006])
Part A - Plain language definition
Kind of work done by persons aged 15 and over. Occupation is based on the type of job the person holds and the description of his or her duties. The 2006 Census data on occupation are classified according to the National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006 (NOC-S 2006). For comparisons with data from the 1991 and 1996 censuses, the variable Occupation (historical) should be used.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the kind of work persons were doing during the reference week, as determined by their kind of work and the description of the main activities in their job. If the person did not have a job during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 16, 2006), the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 2005. Persons with two or more jobs were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.
The 2006 Census occupation data are classified according to the National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006 (NOC-S 2006). This classification is composed of four levels of aggregation. There are 10 broad occupational categories containing 47 major groups that are further subdivided into 140 minor groups. At the most detailed level, there are 520 occupation unit groups. Occupation unit groups are formed on the basis of the education, training, or skill level required to enter the job, as well as the kind of work performed, as determined by the tasks, duties and responsibilities of the occupation.
For information on the NOC-S 2006, see the National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006, Catalogue no. 12-583-XIE.

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 827 referrer

Footnote 828

Unemployed persons 15 years and over who have never worked for pay or in self-employment or who had last worked prior to January 1, 2005, only.

Return to footnote 828 referrer

Footnote 829

Refers to the experienced labour force population: includes persons who were employed and persons who were unemployed who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2005.

Return to footnote 829 referrer

Footnote 887

Occupation (based on the National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006 [NOC-S 2006])
Part A - Plain language definition
Kind of work done by persons aged 15 and over. Occupation is based on the type of job the person holds and the description of his or her duties. The 2006 Census data on occupation are classified according to the National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006 (NOC-S 2006). For comparisons with data from the 1991 and 1996 censuses, the variable Occupation (historical) should be used.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the kind of work persons were doing during the reference week, as determined by their kind of work and the description of the main activities in their job. If the person did not have a job during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 16, 2006), the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 2005. Persons with two or more jobs were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.
The 2006 Census occupation data are classified according to the National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006 (NOC-S 2006). This classification is composed of four levels of aggregation. There are 10 broad occupational categories containing 47 major groups that are further subdivided into 140 minor groups. At the most detailed level, there are 520 occupation unit groups. Occupation unit groups are formed on the basis of the education, training, or skill level required to enter the job, as well as the kind of work performed, as determined by the tasks, duties and responsibilities of the occupation.
For information on the NOC-S 2006, see the National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006, Catalogue no. 12-583-XIE.

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 887 referrer

Footnote 888

Unemployed persons 15 years and over who have never worked for pay or in self-employment or who had last worked prior to January 1, 2005, only.

Return to footnote 888 referrer

Footnote 889

Refers to the experienced labour force population: includes persons who were employed and persons who were unemployed who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2005.

Return to footnote 889 referrer

Footnote 947

Occupation (based on the National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006 [NOC-S 2006])
Part A - Plain language definition
Kind of work done by persons aged 15 and over. Occupation is based on the type of job the person holds and the description of his or her duties. The 2006 Census data on occupation are classified according to the National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006 (NOC-S 2006). For comparisons with data from the 1991 and 1996 censuses, the variable Occupation (historical) should be used.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the kind of work persons were doing during the reference week, as determined by their kind of work and the description of the main activities in their job. If the person did not have a job during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 16, 2006), the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 2005. Persons with two or more jobs were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.
The 2006 Census occupation data are classified according to the National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006 (NOC-S 2006). This classification is composed of four levels of aggregation. There are 10 broad occupational categories containing 47 major groups that are further subdivided into 140 minor groups. At the most detailed level, there are 520 occupation unit groups. Occupation unit groups are formed on the basis of the education, training, or skill level required to enter the job, as well as the kind of work performed, as determined by the tasks, duties and responsibilities of the occupation.
For information on the NOC-S 2006, see the National Occupational Classification for Statistics 2006, Catalogue no. 12-583-XIE.

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 947 referrer

Footnote 948

Unemployed persons 15 years and over who have never worked for pay or in self-employment or who had last worked prior to January 1, 2005, only.

Return to footnote 948 referrer

Footnote 949

Refers to the experienced labour force population: includes persons who were employed and persons who were unemployed who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2005.

Return to footnote 949 referrer

Footnote 1007

Industry (based on the North American Industry Classification System [NAICS] 2002)
Part A - Plain language definition
General nature of the business carried out in the establishment where the person worked. The 2006 Census data on industry (based on the NAICS 2002) can be compared with data from Canada's NAFTA partners (United States and Mexico).
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the general nature of the business carried out in the establishment where the person worked. If the person did not have a job during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 16, 2006), the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 2005. Persons with two or more jobs were required to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

The 2006 Census industry data are produced according to the NAICS 2002. The NAICS provides enhanced industry comparability among the three North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) trading partners (Canada, United States and Mexico). This classification consists of a systematic and comprehensive arrangement of industries structured into 20 sectors, 103 subsectors and 328 industry groups. The criteria used to create these categories are similarity of input structures, labour skills or production processes used by the establishment. For further information on the classification, see North American Industry Classification System, Canada, 2002, Catalogue no. 12-501-XPE.

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 1007 referrer

Footnote 1008

Unemployed persons 15 years and over who have never worked for pay or in self-employment or who had last worked prior to January 1, 2005, only.

Return to footnote 1008 referrer

Footnote 1009

Refers to the experienced labour force population: includes persons who were employed and persons who were unemployed who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2005.

Return to footnote 1009 referrer

Footnote 1030

Industry (based on the North American Industry Classification System [NAICS] 2002)
Part A - Plain language definition
General nature of the business carried out in the establishment where the person worked. The 2006 Census data on industry (based on the NAICS 2002) can be compared with data from Canada's NAFTA partners (United States and Mexico).
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the general nature of the business carried out in the establishment where the person worked. If the person did not have a job during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 16, 2006), the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 2005. Persons with two or more jobs were required to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

The 2006 Census industry data are produced according to the NAICS 2002. The NAICS provides enhanced industry comparability among the three North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) trading partners (Canada, United States and Mexico). This classification consists of a systematic and comprehensive arrangement of industries structured into 20 sectors, 103 subsectors and 328 industry groups. The criteria used to create these categories are similarity of input structures, labour skills or production processes used by the establishment. For further information on the classification, see North American Industry Classification System, Canada, 2002, Catalogue no. 12-501-XPE.

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 1030 referrer

Footnote 1031

Unemployed persons 15 years and over who have never worked for pay or in self-employment or who had last worked prior to January 1, 2005, only.

Return to footnote 1031 referrer

Footnote 1032

Refers to the experienced labour force population: includes persons who were employed and persons who were unemployed who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2005.

Return to footnote 1032 referrer

Footnote 1053

Industry (based on the North American Industry Classification System [NAICS] 2002)
Part A - Plain language definition
General nature of the business carried out in the establishment where the person worked. The 2006 Census data on industry (based on the NAICS 2002) can be compared with data from Canada's NAFTA partners (United States and Mexico).
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the general nature of the business carried out in the establishment where the person worked. If the person did not have a job during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to enumeration (May 16, 2006), the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 2005. Persons with two or more jobs were required to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

The 2006 Census industry data are produced according to the NAICS 2002. The NAICS provides enhanced industry comparability among the three North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) trading partners (Canada, United States and Mexico). This classification consists of a systematic and comprehensive arrangement of industries structured into 20 sectors, 103 subsectors and 328 industry groups. The criteria used to create these categories are similarity of input structures, labour skills or production processes used by the establishment. For further information on the classification, see North American Industry Classification System, Canada, 2002, Catalogue no. 12-501-XPE.

Labour force
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).

Labour force = Employed + Unemployed

Return to footnote 1053 referrer

Footnote 1054

Unemployed persons 15 years and over who have never worked for pay or in self-employment or who had last worked prior to January 1, 2005, only.

Return to footnote 1054 referrer

Footnote 1055

Refers to the experienced labour force population: includes persons who were employed and persons who were unemployed who worked for pay or in self-employment since January 1, 2005.


Return to footnote 1055 referrer

Footnote 1076

Place of work status
Part A - Plain language definition
Classification of people aged 15 or over who worked at some point between January 1, 2005 and May 16, 2006 (Census Day), according to whether they worked at home, worked outside Canada, had no fixed workplace address, or worked at a specific address.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the place of work of non-institutional residents 15 years of age and over who worked at some time since January 1, 2005. The variable usually relates to the individual's job held in the week prior to enumeration. However, if the person did not work during that week but had worked at some time since January 1, 2005, the information relates to the job held longest during that period.

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Footnote 1100

Mode of transportation
Part A - Plain language definition
Main means a person uses to travel between home and place of work (by car, on foot, on public transit, or by some other means).
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the mode of transportation to work of non-institutional residents 15 years of age and over who worked at some time since January 1, 2005. Persons who indicate in the place of work question that they either had no fixed workplace address, or specified a usual workplace address, are asked to identify the mode of transportation they usually use to commute from home to work. The variable usually relates to the individual's job in the week prior to enumeration. However, if the person did not work during that week but had worked at some time since January 1, 2005, the information relates to the job held longest during that period.

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Footnote 1127

Language of work
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the language used most often at work by the individual at the time of the census. Other languages used at work on a regular basis are also collected.

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Footnote 1132

The 2006 category 'Chinese, n.o.s.' includes responses of 'Chinese' as well as all Chinese languages other than Cantonese, Mandarin, Taiwanese, Chaochow (Teochow), Fukien, Hakka and Shanghainese. Data for the 'Chinese, n.o.s.' category in 2001 and 2006 are not directly comparable. The 2001 category 'Chinese, n.o.s.' is equivalent to the sum of the 2006 categories 'Chinese, n.o.s.' and 'Chaochow (Teochow),' 'Fukien,' 'Shanghainese' and 'Taiwanese.'

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Footnote 1142

This is a subtotal of all languages collected by the census that are not displayed separately here. For a full list of languages collected in the census, please refer to Appendix G in the 2006 Census Dictionary.

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Footnote 1148

Hours spent doing unpaid housework
Part A - Plain language definition
Number of hours that the person spent doing housework, maintaining the house or doing yard work without getting paid for doing so. For example, this includes time spent preparing meals, mowing the lawn, or cleaning the house, for oneself or for relatives, friends or neighbours. The time spent on this activity is divided into blocks of hours (None, Less than 5 hours, 5 to 14 hours, 15 to 29 hours, 30 to 59 hours, and 60 hours or more). Only hours spent on the activity during the week before Census Day (May 7 to 13, 2006) are counted.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of hours persons spent doing unpaid housework, yard work or home maintenance in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). It includes hours spent doing unpaid housework for members of one's own household, for other family members outside the household, and for friends or neighbours.
Unpaid housework does not include volunteer work for a non-profit organization, a religious organization, a charity or community group, or work without pay in the operation of a family farm, business or professional practice.

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Footnote 1155

Hours spent doing unpaid housework
Part A - Plain language definition
Number of hours that the person spent doing housework, maintaining the house or doing yard work without getting paid for doing so. For example, this includes time spent preparing meals, mowing the lawn, or cleaning the house, for oneself or for relatives, friends or neighbours. The time spent on this activity is divided into blocks of hours (None, Less than 5 hours, 5 to 14 hours, 15 to 29 hours, 30 to 59 hours, and 60 hours or more). Only hours spent on the activity during the week before Census Day (May 7 to 13, 2006) are counted.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of hours persons spent doing unpaid housework, yard work or home maintenance in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). It includes hours spent doing unpaid housework for members of one's own household, for other family members outside the household, and for friends or neighbours.
Unpaid housework does not include volunteer work for a non-profit organization, a religious organization, a charity or community group, or work without pay in the operation of a family farm, business or professional practice.

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Footnote 1162

Hours spent doing unpaid housework
Part A - Plain language definition
Number of hours that the person spent doing housework, maintaining the house or doing yard work without getting paid for doing so. For example, this includes time spent preparing meals, mowing the lawn, or cleaning the house, for oneself or for relatives, friends or neighbours. The time spent on this activity is divided into blocks of hours (None, Less than 5 hours, 5 to 14 hours, 15 to 29 hours, 30 to 59 hours, and 60 hours or more). Only hours spent on the activity during the week before Census Day (May 7 to 13, 2006) are counted.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of hours persons spent doing unpaid housework, yard work or home maintenance in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006). It includes hours spent doing unpaid housework for members of one's own household, for other family members outside the household, and for friends or neighbours.
Unpaid housework does not include volunteer work for a non-profit organization, a religious organization, a charity or community group, or work without pay in the operation of a family farm, business or professional practice.

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Footnote 1169

Hours spent looking after children, without pay
Part A - Plain language definition
Number of hours that the person spent looking after children without getting paid for doing so. For example, this includes time spent taking care of one's own children or looking after the children of relatives, friends or neighbours. The time spent on this activity is divided into blocks of hours (none, less than 5 hours, 5 to 14 hours, 15 to 29 hours, 30 to 59 hours, and 60 hours or more). Only hours spent on the activity during the week before Census Day (May 7 to 13, 2006) are counted.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of hours persons spent looking after children without pay. It includes hours spent providing unpaid child care for members of one's own household, for other family members outside the household, for friends or neighbours in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).
Unpaid child care does not include volunteer work for a non-profit organization, a religious organization, a charity or community group, or work without pay in the operation of a family farm, business or professional practice.

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Footnote 1176

Hours spent looking after children, without pay
Part A - Plain language definition
Number of hours that the person spent looking after children without getting paid for doing so. For example, this includes time spent taking care of one's own children or looking after the children of relatives, friends or neighbours. The time spent on this activity is divided into blocks of hours (none, less than 5 hours, 5 to 14 hours, 15 to 29 hours, 30 to 59 hours, and 60 hours or more). Only hours spent on the activity during the week before Census Day (May 7 to 13, 2006) are counted.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of hours persons spent looking after children without pay. It includes hours spent providing unpaid child care for members of one's own household, for other family members outside the household, for friends or neighbours in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).
Unpaid child care does not include volunteer work for a non-profit organization, a religious organization, a charity or community group, or work without pay in the operation of a family farm, business or professional practice.

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Footnote 1183

Hours spent looking after children, without pay
Part A - Plain language definition
Number of hours that the person spent looking after children without getting paid for doing so. For example, this includes time spent taking care of one's own children or looking after the children of relatives, friends or neighbours. The time spent on this activity is divided into blocks of hours (none, less than 5 hours, 5 to 14 hours, 15 to 29 hours, 30 to 59 hours, and 60 hours or more). Only hours spent on the activity during the week before Census Day (May 7 to 13, 2006) are counted.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of hours persons spent looking after children without pay. It includes hours spent providing unpaid child care for members of one's own household, for other family members outside the household, for friends or neighbours in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).
Unpaid child care does not include volunteer work for a non-profit organization, a religious organization, a charity or community group, or work without pay in the operation of a family farm, business or professional practice.

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Footnote 1190

Hours spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors
Part A - Plain language definition
Number of hours that the person spent providing care or assistance to elderly people without getting paid for doing so. This includes time spent giving personal care to an elderly relative, helping elderly neighbours with their shopping, and so on. The time spent on this activity is divided into blocks of hours (None, Less than 5 hours, 5 to 9 hours, 10 to 19 hours, and 20 hours or more). Only hours spent on the activity during the week before Census Day (May 7 to 13, 2006) are counted.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of hours persons spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors of one's own household, to other senior family members outside the household, and to friends or neighbours in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).
Unpaid care or assistance to seniors does not include volunteer work for a non-profit organization, religious organization, charity or community group, or work without pay in the operation of a family farm, business or professional practice.

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Footnote 1196

Hours spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors
Part A - Plain language definition
Number of hours that the person spent providing care or assistance to elderly people without getting paid for doing so. This includes time spent giving personal care to an elderly relative, helping elderly neighbours with their shopping, and so on. The time spent on this activity is divided into blocks of hours (None, Less than 5 hours, 5 to 9 hours, 10 to 19 hours, and 20 hours or more). Only hours spent on the activity during the week before Census Day (May 7 to 13, 2006) are counted.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of hours persons spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors of one's own household, to other senior family members outside the household, and to friends or neighbours in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).
Unpaid care or assistance to seniors does not include volunteer work for a non-profit organization, religious organization, charity or community group, or work without pay in the operation of a family farm, business or professional practice.

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Footnote 1202

Hours spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors
Part A - Plain language definition
Number of hours that the person spent providing care or assistance to elderly people without getting paid for doing so. This includes time spent giving personal care to an elderly relative, helping elderly neighbours with their shopping, and so on. The time spent on this activity is divided into blocks of hours (None, Less than 5 hours, 5 to 9 hours, 10 to 19 hours, and 20 hours or more). Only hours spent on the activity during the week before Census Day (May 7 to 13, 2006) are counted.
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to the number of hours persons spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors of one's own household, to other senior family members outside the household, and to friends or neighbours in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day (May 16, 2006).
Unpaid care or assistance to seniors does not include volunteer work for a non-profit organization, religious organization, charity or community group, or work without pay in the operation of a family farm, business or professional practice.

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Footnote 1208

'Field of study' is defined as the main discipline or subject of learning. It is collected for the highest certificate, diploma or degree above the high school or secondary school level.

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Footnote 1220

Includes Multidisciplinary/interdisciplinary studies, other.

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Footnote 1221

'Field of study' is defined as the main discipline or subject of learning. It is collected for the highest certificate, diploma or degree above the high school or secondary school level.

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Footnote 1233

Includes Multidisciplinary/interdisciplinary studies, other.

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Footnote 1234

'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' refers to the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed based on a hierarchy which is generally related to the amount of time spent 'in-class.' For postsecondary completers, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than in the trades. Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom.

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Footnote 1237

'High school certificate or equivalent' includes persons who have graduated from a secondary school or equivalent. Excludes persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, private trade schools, private business colleges, schools of nursing and universities.

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Footnote 1239

'College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma' replaces the category 'Other non-university certificate or diploma' used in previous censuses. This category includes accreditation by non-degree-granting institutions such as community colleges, CEGEPs, private business colleges and technical institutes.

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Footnote 1248

'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' refers to the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed based on a hierarchy which is generally related to the amount of time spent 'in-class.' For postsecondary completers, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than in the trades. Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom.

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Footnote 1251

'High school certificate or equivalent' includes persons who have graduated from a secondary school or equivalent. Excludes persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, private trade schools, private business colleges, schools of nursing and universities.

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Footnote 1253

'College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma' replaces the category 'Other non-university certificate or diploma' used in previous censuses. This category includes accreditation by non-degree-granting institutions such as community colleges, CEGEPs, private business colleges and technical institutes.

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Footnote 1262

'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' refers to the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed based on a hierarchy which is generally related to the amount of time spent 'in-class.' For postsecondary completers, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than in the trades. Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom.

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Footnote 1265

'High school certificate or equivalent' includes persons who have graduated from a secondary school or equivalent. Excludes persons with a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. Examples of postsecondary institutions include community colleges, institutes of technology, CEGEPs, private trade schools, private business colleges, schools of nursing and universities.

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Footnote 1267

'College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma' replaces the category 'Other non-university certificate or diploma' used in previous censuses. This category includes accreditation by non-degree-granting institutions such as community colleges, CEGEPs, private business colleges and technical institutes.

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Footnote 1276

'Location of study' refers to the province, territory or country where the highest certificate, diploma, or degree above high school level was completed.

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Footnote 1292

Aboriginal ancestry
Part A - Plain language definition
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition
Refers to those persons who reported at least one Aboriginal ancestry (North American Indian, Métis or Inuit) to the ethnic origin question. 'Ethnic origin' refers to the ethnic or cultural origins of the respondent's ancestors.
'Aboriginal ancestry' was referred to as 'Aboriginal origin' prior to the 2006 Census. The content of the variable remains unchanged in 2006 compared with previous censuses.

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Footnote 1293

Refers to those persons who reported at least one Aboriginal ancestry (North American Indian, Métis or Inuit) to the ethnic origin question. 'Ethnic origin' refers to the ethnic or cultural origins of a person's ancestors. Additional information on ethnic origin can be obtained from the 2006 Census Dictionary. 'Aboriginal ancestry' was referred to as 'Aboriginal origin' prior to the 2006 Census. The content of the variable remains unchanged in 2006 compared with the previous censuses.

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Footnote 1300

Includes those who reported multiple Aboriginal ancestries or multiple Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal ancestries to the ethnic origin question.

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Footnote 1303

The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as 'persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.'

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Footnote 1305

For example, 'East Indian,' 'Pakistani,' 'Sri Lankan,' etc.

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Footnote 1309

For example, 'Vietnamese,' 'Cambodian,' 'Malaysian,' 'Laotian,' etc.

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Footnote 1311

For example, 'Iranian,' 'Afghan,' etc.

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Footnote 1314

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.' Includes respondents who reported a write-in response such as 'Guyanese,' 'West Indian,' 'Kurd,' 'Tibetan,' 'Polynesian,' 'Pacific Islander,' etc.

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Footnote 1315

Includes respondents who reported more than one visible minority group by checking two or more mark-in circles, e.g., 'Black' and 'South Asian.'

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Footnote 1316

Includes respondents who reported 'Yes' to the Aboriginal identity question (Question 18) as well as respondents who were not considered to be members of a visible minority group.

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Footnote 1317

This is a total population count. The sum of the ethnic groups in this table is greater than the total population count because a person may report more than one ethnic origin in the census.

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Footnote 1325

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.'

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Footnote 1348

The abbreviation 'n.o.s.' means 'not otherwise specified.'

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Footnote 1361

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.'

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Footnote 1384

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.'

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Footnote 1402

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.'

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Footnote 1435

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.'

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Footnote 1441

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.'

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Footnote 1454

The abbreviation 'n.o.s.' means 'not otherwise specified.'

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Footnote 1462

The abbreviation 'n.o.s.' means 'not otherwise specified.'

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Footnote 1488

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.'

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Footnote 1501

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.'

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Footnote 1506

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.'

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Footnote 1519

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.'

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Footnote 1533

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.'

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Footnote 1552

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.'

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Footnote 1553

The abbreviation 'n.o.s.' means 'not otherwise specified.'

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Footnote 1563

The abbreviation 'n.i.e.' means 'not included elsewhere.'

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Footnote 1564

'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

'After-tax income' refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic]), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

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Footnote 1567

Including loss.

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Footnote 1583

For persons with income.

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Footnote 1584

For persons with income.

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Footnote 1585

For persons with income.

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Footnote 1586

'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

'After-tax income' refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic]), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

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Footnote 1589

Including loss.

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Footnote 1605

For persons with income.

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Footnote 1606

For persons with income.

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Footnote 1607

For persons with income.

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Footnote 1608

'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

'After-tax income' refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic]), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1608 referrer

Footnote 1611

Including loss.

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Footnote 1627

For persons with income.

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Footnote 1628

For persons with income.

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Footnote 1629

For persons with income.

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Footnote 1630

'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

'After-tax income' refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic]), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1630 referrer

Footnote 1633

Including loss.

Return to footnote 1633 referrer

Footnote 1648

For persons with after-tax income.

Return to footnote 1648 referrer

Footnote 1649

For persons with after-tax income.

Return to footnote 1649 referrer

Footnote 1650

For persons with after-tax income.

Return to footnote 1650 referrer

Footnote 1651

'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

'After-tax income' refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic]), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1651 referrer

Footnote 1654

Including loss.

Return to footnote 1654 referrer

Footnote 1669

For persons with after-tax income.

Return to footnote 1669 referrer

Footnote 1670

For persons with after-tax income.

Return to footnote 1670 referrer

Footnote 1671

For persons with after-tax income.

Return to footnote 1671 referrer

Footnote 1672

'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

'After-tax income' refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic]), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1672 referrer

Footnote 1675

Including loss.

Return to footnote 1675 referrer

Footnote 1690

For persons with after-tax income.

Return to footnote 1690 referrer

Footnote 1691

For persons with after-tax income.

Return to footnote 1691 referrer

Footnote 1692

For persons with after-tax income.

Return to footnote 1692 referrer

Footnote 1693

Earnings or employment income - Refers to total income received by persons 15 years of age and over during calendar year 2005 as wages and salaries, net income from a non-farm unincorporated business and/or professional practice, and/or net farm self-employment income.

Wages and salaries - Refers to gross wages and salaries before deductions for such items as income tax, pensions and Employment Insurance. Included in this source are military pay and allowances, tips, commissions and cash bonuses, benefits from wage-loss replacement plans or income-maintenance insurance plans, supplementary unemployment benefits from an employer or union as well as all types of casual earnings during calendar year 2005. Other employment income such as taxable benefits, research grants and royalties are included.
Net farm income - Refers to net income (gross receipts from farm sales minus depreciation and cost of operation) received during calendar year 2005 from the operation of a farm, either on the respondent's own account or in partnership. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share of income was reported. Included with gross receipts are cash advances received in 2005, dividends from cooperatives, rebates and farm-support payments to farmers from federal, provincial and regional agricultural programs (for example, milk subsidies and marketing board payments) and gross insurance proceeds such as payments from the Net Income Stabilization Account (NISA). The value of income 'in kind,' such as agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm, is excluded.
Net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice - Refers to net income (gross receipts minus expenses of operation such as wages, rents and depreciation) received during calendar year 2005 from the respondent's non-farm unincorporated business or professional practice. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share was reported. Also included is net income from persons babysitting in their own homes, persons providing room and board to non-relatives, self-employed fishers, hunters and trappers, operators of direct distributorships such as those selling and delivering cosmetics, as well as freelance activities of artists, writers, music teachers, hairdressers, dressmakers, etc.
Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics for earnings or any other source of income and after-tax income of persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Work activity - Refers to the number of weeks in which a person worked for pay or in self-employment in the reference year at all jobs held, even if only for a few hours, and whether these weeks were mostly full time (30 hours or more per week) or mostly part time (1 to 29 hours per week). Persons with a part-time job for part of the year and a full-time job for another part of the year were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most weeks. The term 'Full-year full-time workers' refers to persons 15 years of age and over who worked 49 to 52 weeks (mostly full time) in the reference year for pay or in self-employment.

Includes persons who did not work in 2005 but reported employment income.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1693 referrer

Footnote 1697

Worked 49 to 52 weeks in 2005, mostly full time.

Return to footnote 1697 referrer

Footnote 1701

Worked less than 49 weeks or worked mostly part time in 2005.

Return to footnote 1701 referrer

Footnote 1705

Earnings or employment income - Refers to total income received by persons 15 years of age and over during calendar year 2005 as wages and salaries, net income from a non-farm unincorporated business and/or professional practice, and/or net farm self-employment income.

Wages and salaries - Refers to gross wages and salaries before deductions for such items as income tax, pensions and Employment Insurance. Included in this source are military pay and allowances, tips, commissions and cash bonuses, benefits from wage-loss replacement plans or income-maintenance insurance plans, supplementary unemployment benefits from an employer or union as well as all types of casual earnings during calendar year 2005. Other employment income such as taxable benefits, research grants and royalties are included.
Net farm income - Refers to net income (gross receipts from farm sales minus depreciation and cost of operation) received during calendar year 2005 from the operation of a farm, either on the respondent's own account or in partnership. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share of income was reported. Included with gross receipts are cash advances received in 2005, dividends from cooperatives, rebates and farm-support payments to farmers from federal, provincial and regional agricultural programs (for example, milk subsidies and marketing board payments) and gross insurance proceeds such as payments from the Net Income Stabilization Account (NISA). The value of income 'in kind,' such as agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm, is excluded.
Net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice - Refers to net income (gross receipts minus expenses of operation such as wages, rents and depreciation) received during calendar year 2005 from the respondent's non-farm unincorporated business or professional practice. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share was reported. Also included is net income from persons babysitting in their own homes, persons providing room and board to non-relatives, self-employed fishers, hunters and trappers, operators of direct distributorships such as those selling and delivering cosmetics, as well as freelance activities of artists, writers, music teachers, hairdressers, dressmakers, etc.
Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics for earnings or any other source of income and after-tax income of persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Work activity - Refers to the number of weeks in which a person worked for pay or in self-employment in the reference year at all jobs held, even if only for a few hours, and whether these weeks were mostly full time (30 hours or more per week) or mostly part time (1 to 29 hours per week). Persons with a part-time job for part of the year and a full-time job for another part of the year were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most weeks. The term 'Full-year full-time workers' refers to persons 15 years of age and over who worked 49 to 52 weeks (mostly full time) in the reference year for pay or in self-employment.

Includes persons who did not work in 2005 but reported employment income.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1705 referrer

Footnote 1709

Worked 49 to 52 weeks in 2005, mostly full time.

Return to footnote 1709 referrer

Footnote 1713

Worked less than 49 weeks or worked mostly part time in 2005.

Return to footnote 1713 referrer

Footnote 1717

Earnings or employment income - Refers to total income received by persons 15 years of age and over during calendar year 2005 as wages and salaries, net income from a non-farm unincorporated business and/or professional practice, and/or net farm self-employment income.

Wages and salaries - Refers to gross wages and salaries before deductions for such items as income tax, pensions and Employment Insurance. Included in this source are military pay and allowances, tips, commissions and cash bonuses, benefits from wage-loss replacement plans or income-maintenance insurance plans, supplementary unemployment benefits from an employer or union as well as all types of casual earnings during calendar year 2005. Other employment income such as taxable benefits, research grants and royalties are included.
Net farm income - Refers to net income (gross receipts from farm sales minus depreciation and cost of operation) received during calendar year 2005 from the operation of a farm, either on the respondent's own account or in partnership. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share of income was reported. Included with gross receipts are cash advances received in 2005, dividends from cooperatives, rebates and farm-support payments to farmers from federal, provincial and regional agricultural programs (for example, milk subsidies and marketing board payments) and gross insurance proceeds such as payments from the Net Income Stabilization Account (NISA). The value of income 'in kind,' such as agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm, is excluded.
Net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice - Refers to net income (gross receipts minus expenses of operation such as wages, rents and depreciation) received during calendar year 2005 from the respondent's non-farm unincorporated business or professional practice. In the case of partnerships, only the respondent's share was reported. Also included is net income from persons babysitting in their own homes, persons providing room and board to non-relatives, self-employed fishers, hunters and trappers, operators of direct distributorships such as those selling and delivering cosmetics, as well as freelance activities of artists, writers, music teachers, hairdressers, dressmakers, etc.
Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics for earnings or any other source of income and after-tax income of persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Work activity - Refers to the number of weeks in which a person worked for pay or in self-employment in the reference year at all jobs held, even if only for a few hours, and whether these weeks were mostly full time (30 hours or more per week) or mostly part time (1 to 29 hours per week). Persons with a part-time job for part of the year and a full-time job for another part of the year were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most weeks. The term 'Full-year full-time workers' refers to persons 15 years of age and over who worked 49 to 52 weeks (mostly full time) in the reference year for pay or in self-employment.

Includes persons who did not work in 2005 but reported employment income.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1717 referrer

Footnote 1721

Worked 49 to 52 weeks in 2005, mostly full time.

Return to footnote 1721 referrer

Footnote 1725

Worked less than 49 weeks or worked mostly part time in 2005.

Return to footnote 1725 referrer

Footnote 1729

Economic family total income - The total income of an economic family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

After-tax income of economic families - The after-tax income of an economic family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members or persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households (for example, two-person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.

Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.

Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

Other economic families are those in which any person not in a census family can be the economic family reference person.

Return to footnote 1729 referrer

Footnote 1744

Economic family total income - The total income of an economic family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

After-tax income of economic families - The after-tax income of an economic family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members or persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households (for example, two-person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.

Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.

Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

Other economic families are those in which any person not in a census family can be the economic family reference person.

Couple economic families refer to those husband-wife, opposite-sex common-law couple families and same-sex married and common-law couple families in which the economic family reference person is one of the spouses or partners.

Return to footnote 1744 referrer

Footnote 1759

Economic family total income - The total income of an economic family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

After-tax income of economic families - The after-tax income of an economic family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members or persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households (for example, two-person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Composition of income - The composition of the total income of a population group or a geographic area refers to the relative share of each income source or group of sources, expressed as a percentage of the aggregate total income of that group or area.

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either, a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.

Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.

Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

Other economic families are those in which any person not in a census family can be the economic family reference person.

Return to footnote 1759 referrer

Footnote 1763

Economic family total income - The total income of an economic family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

After-tax income of economic families - The after-tax income of an economic family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members or persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households (for example, two-person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Composition of income - The composition of the total income of a population group or a geographic area refers to the relative share of each income source or group of sources, expressed as a percentage of the aggregate total income of that group or area.

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either, a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.

Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.

Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

Other economic families are those in which any person not in a census family can be the economic family reference person.

Couple economic families refer to those husband-wife, opposite-sex common-law couple families and same-sex married and common-law couple families in which the economic family reference person is one of the spouses or partners.

Return to footnote 1763 referrer

Footnote 1767

Economic family total income - The total income of an economic family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

After-tax income of economic families - The after-tax income of an economic family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members or persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households (for example, two-person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Composition of income - The composition of the total income of a population group or a geographic area refers to the relative share of each income source or group of sources, expressed as a percentage of the aggregate total income of that group or area.

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either, a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.

Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.

Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

Other economic families are those in which any person not in a census family can be the economic family reference person.

Return to footnote 1767 referrer

Footnote 1771

Economic family total income - The total income of an economic family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

After-tax income of economic families - The after-tax income of an economic family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members or persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households (for example, two-person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Composition of income - The composition of the total income of a population group or a geographic area refers to the relative share of each income source or group of sources, expressed as a percentage of the aggregate total income of that group or area.

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either, a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.

Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.

Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

Other economic families are those in which any person not in a census family can be the economic family reference person.

Return to footnote 1771 referrer

Footnote 1775

Economic family total income - The total income of an economic family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

After-tax income of economic families - The after-tax income of an economic family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members or persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households (for example, two-person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.

Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.

Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

All other economic families are those in which a person not in a census family is the economic family reference person.

Return to footnote 1775 referrer

Footnote 1788

Economic family total income - The total income of an economic family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

After-tax income of economic families - The after-tax income of an economic family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members or persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households (for example, two-person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.

Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.

Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

All other economic families are those in which a person not in a census family is the economic family reference person.

Couple economic families refer to those husband-wife, opposite-sex common-law couple families and same-sex married and common-law couple families in which the economic family reference person is one of the spouses or partners.

Return to footnote 1788 referrer

Footnote 1801

Economic family total income - The total income of an economic family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

After-tax income of economic families - The after-tax income of an economic family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members or persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households (for example, two-person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common-law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.

Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.

Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

Return to footnote 1801 referrer

Footnote 1808

Economic family total income - The total income of an economic family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

After-tax income of economic families - The after-tax income of an economic family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members or persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households (for example, two-person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common-law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.

Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.

Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

Couple economic families refer to those husband-wife, opposite-sex common-law couple families and same-sex married and common-law couple families in which the economic family reference person is one of the spouses or partners.

Return to footnote 1808 referrer

Footnote 1815

Economic family total income - The total income of an economic family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

After-tax income of economic families - The after-tax income of an economic family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members or persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households (for example, two-person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common-law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.

Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.

Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

Return to footnote 1815 referrer

Footnote 1822

Economic family total income - The total income of an economic family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

After-tax income of economic families - The after-tax income of an economic family is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that family. After-tax income of family members or persons not in families refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households (for example, two-person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common-law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.

Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.

Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

Return to footnote 1822 referrer

Footnote 1829

'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

'After-tax income' refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic]), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Economic family status - Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not the persons are members of an economic family.

Economic family persons refer to two or more household members who are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, and thereby constitute an economic family.
They can be further classified as follows:

Economic family reference persons - In each economic family, one person is designated as the reference person. For purposes of presentation of historically comparable low-income statistics, the following designations have been made. The male spouse or partner is designated as the reference person in opposite-sex couple families. In lone-parent families, the male or female lone parent is the reference person. In same-sex couple families, the first person in the couple listed on the questionnaire is the economic family reference person. In all other economic families, the reference person can be either a male or female person not in a census family.

Economic family members - Persons other than the reference person (as described above) who belong to the same economic family are classified as female spouses or partners, male or female same-sex spouses or partners, never-married sons or daughters, other sons or daughters or other economic family members. For 2006, other economic family members include foster children. They were previously classified as persons not in economic families.

Persons not in economic families - Household members who do not belong to an economic family. Persons living alone are included in this category.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1829 referrer

Footnote 1849

'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

'After-tax income' refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic]), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Economic family status - Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not the persons are members of an economic family.

Economic family persons refer to two or more household members who are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, and thereby constitute an economic family.
They can be further classified as follows:

Economic family reference persons - In each economic family, one person is designated as the reference person. For purposes of presentation of historically comparable low-income statistics, the following designations have been made. The male spouse or partner is designated as the reference person in opposite-sex couple families. In lone-parent families, the male or female lone parent is the reference person. In same-sex couple families, the first person in the couple listed on the questionnaire is the economic family reference person. In all other economic families, the reference person can be either a male or female person not in a census family.

Economic family members - Persons other than the reference person (as described above) who belong to the same economic family are classified as female spouses or partners, male or female same-sex spouses or partners, never-married sons or daughters, other sons or daughters or other economic family members. For 2006, other economic family members include foster children. They were previously classified as persons not in economic families.

Persons not in economic families - Household members who do not belong to an economic family. Persons living alone are included in this category.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1849 referrer

Footnote 1869

'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

-wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

'After-tax income' refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic]), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Economic family status - Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not the persons are members of an economic family.

Economic family persons refer to two or more household members who are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, and thereby constitute an economic family.
They can be further classified as follows:

Economic family reference persons - In each economic family, one person is designated as the reference person. For purposes of presentation of historically comparable low-income statistics, the following designations have been made. The male spouse or partner is designated as the reference person in opposite-sex couple families. In lone-parent families, the male or female lone parent is the reference person. In same-sex couple families, the first person in the couple listed on the questionnaire is the economic family reference person. In all other economic families, the reference person can be either a male or female person not in a census family.

Economic family members - Persons other than the reference person (as described above) who belong to the same economic family are classified as female spouses or partners, male or female same-sex spouses or partners, never-married sons or daughters, other sons or daughters or other economic family members. For 2006, other economic family members include foster children. They were previously classified as persons not in economic families.

Persons not in economic families - Household members who do not belong to an economic family. Persons living alone are included in this category.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1869 referrer

Footnote 1889

'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

'After-tax income' refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic]), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Composition of income - The composition of the total income of a population group or a geographic area refers to the relative share of each income source or group of sources, expressed as a percentage of the aggregate total income of that group or area.

Economic family status - Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not the persons are members of an economic family.

Economic family persons refer to two or more household members who are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, and thereby constitute an economic family.
They can be further classified as follows:

Economic family reference persons - In each economic family, one person is designated as the reference person. For purposes of presentation of historically comparable low-income statistics, the following designations have been made. The male spouse or partner is designated as the reference person in opposite-sex couple families. In lone-parent families, the male or female lone parent is the reference person. In same-sex couple families, the first person in the couple listed on the questionnaire is the economic family reference person. In all other economic families, the reference person can be either a male or female person not in a census family.

Economic family members - Persons other than the reference person (as described above) who belong to the same economic family are classified as female spouses or partners, male or female same-sex spouses or partners, never-married sons or daughters, other sons or daughters or other economic family members. For 2006, other economic family members include foster children. They were previously classified as persons not in economic families.

Persons not in economic families - Household members who do not belong to an economic family. Persons living alone are included in this category.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1889 referrer

Footnote 1893

'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

'After-tax income' refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic]), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Composition of income - The composition of the total income of a population group or a geographic area refers to the relative share of each income source or group of sources, expressed as a percentage of the aggregate total income of that group or area.

Economic family status - Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not the persons are members of an economic family.

Economic family persons refer to two or more household members who are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, and thereby constitute an economic family.
They can be further classified as follows:

Economic family reference persons - In each economic family, one person is designated as the reference person. For purposes of presentation of historically comparable low-income statistics, the following designations have been made. The male spouse or partner is designated as the reference person in opposite-sex couple families. In lone-parent families, the male or female lone parent is the reference person. In same-sex couple families, the first person in the couple listed on the questionnaire is the economic family reference person. In all other economic families, the reference person can be either a male or female person not in a census family.

Economic family members - Persons other than the reference person (as described above) who belong to the same economic family are classified as female spouses or partners, male or female same-sex spouses or partners, never-married sons or daughters, other sons or daughters or other economic family members. For 2006, other economic family members include foster children. They were previously classified as persons not in economic families.

Persons not in economic families - Household members who do not belong to an economic family. Persons living alone are included in this category.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1893 referrer

Footnote 1897

'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

'After-tax income' refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic]), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Composition of income - The composition of the total income of a population group or a geographic area refers to the relative share of each income source or group of sources, expressed as a percentage of the aggregate total income of that group or area.

Economic family status - Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not the persons are members of an economic family.

Economic family persons refer to two or more household members who are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, and thereby constitute an economic family.
They can be further classified as follows:

Economic family reference persons - In each economic family, one person is designated as the reference person. For purposes of presentation of historically comparable low-income statistics, the following designations have been made. The male spouse or partner is designated as the reference person in opposite-sex couple families. In lone-parent families, the male or female lone parent is the reference person. In same-sex couple families, the first person in the couple listed on the questionnaire is the economic family reference person. In all other economic families, the reference person can be either a male or female person not in a census family.

Economic family members - Persons other than the reference person (as described above) who belong to the same economic family are classified as female spouses or partners, male or female same-sex spouses or partners, never-married sons or daughters, other sons or daughters or other economic family members. For 2006, other economic family members include foster children. They were previously classified as persons not in economic families.

Persons not in economic families - Household members who do not belong to an economic family. Persons living alone are included in this category.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1897 referrer

Footnote 1901

'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

'After-tax income' refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic]), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Economic family status - Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not the persons are members of an economic family.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1901 referrer

Footnote 1920

'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

'After-tax income' refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic]), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Economic family status - Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not the persons are members of an economic family.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1920 referrer

Footnote 1939

'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:

- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.

'After-tax income' refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excluded gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions, as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of individuals - Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

Median income of individuals - The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e., the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.

Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families [census/economic]), persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.

These statistics can be derived for after-tax income, earnings, wages and salaries, or any other particular source of income in the same manner.

Economic family status - Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not the persons are members of an economic family.

Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1939 referrer

Footnote 1958

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either, a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.
Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.
Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

Return to footnote 1958 referrer

Footnote 1959

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1959 referrer

Footnote 1960

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1960 referrer

Footnote 1961

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either, a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.
Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.
Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

Return to footnote 1961 referrer

Footnote 1962

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1962 referrer

Footnote 1963

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1963 referrer

Footnote 1964

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either, a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.
Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.
Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

Return to footnote 1964 referrer

Footnote 1965

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1965 referrer

Footnote 1966

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1966 referrer

Footnote 1967

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either, a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.
Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.
Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.

Return to footnote 1967 referrer

Footnote 1968

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1968 referrer

Footnote 1969

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1969 referrer

Footnote 1970

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family status - Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not the persons are members of an economic family.

Economic family persons refer to two or more household members who are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, and thereby constitute an economic family. They can be further classified as follows:

Economic family reference persons - In each economic family, one person is designated as the reference person. For purposes of presentation of historically comparable low-income statistics, the following designations have been made. The male spouse or partner is designated as the reference person in opposite-sex couple families. In lone-parent families, the male or female lone parent is the reference person. In same-sex couple families, the first person in the couple listed on the questionnaire is the economic family reference person. In all other economic families, the reference person can be either a male or female person not in a census family.

Economic family members - Persons other than the reference person (as described above) who belong to the same economic family are classified as female spouses or partners, male or female same-sex spouses or partners, never-married sons or daughters, other sons or daughters or other economic family members. For 2006, other economic family members include foster children. They were previously classified as persons not in economic families.

Persons not in economic families - Household members who do not belong to an economic family. Persons living alone are included in this category.
Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1970 referrer

Footnote 1971

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1971 referrer

Footnote 1972

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1972 referrer

Footnote 1973

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family status - Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not the persons are members of an economic family.

Economic family persons refer to two or more household members who are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, and thereby constitute an economic family. They can be further classified as follows:

Economic family reference persons - In each economic family, one person is designated as the reference person. For purposes of presentation of historically comparable low-income statistics, the following designations have been made. The male spouse or partner is designated as the reference person in opposite-sex couple families. In lone-parent families, the male or female lone parent is the reference person. In same-sex couple families, the first person in the couple listed on the questionnaire is the economic family reference person. In all other economic families, the reference person can be either a male or female person not in a census family.

Economic family members - Persons other than the reference person (as described above) who belong to the same economic family are classified as female spouses or partners, male or female same-sex spouses or partners, never-married sons or daughters, other sons or daughters or other economic family members. For 2006, other economic family members include foster children. They were previously classified as persons not in economic families.

Persons not in economic families - Household members who do not belong to an economic family. Persons living alone are included in this category.
Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1973 referrer

Footnote 1974

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1974 referrer

Footnote 1975

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1975 referrer

Footnote 1976

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family status - Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not the persons are members of an economic family.

Economic family persons refer to two or more household members who are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, and thereby constitute an economic family. They can be further classified as follows:

Economic family reference persons - In each economic family, one person is designated as the reference person. For purposes of presentation of historically comparable low-income statistics, the following designations have been made. The male spouse or partner is designated as the reference person in opposite-sex couple families. In lone-parent families, the male or female lone parent is the reference person. In same-sex couple families, the first person in the couple listed on the questionnaire is the economic family reference person. In all other economic families, the reference person can be either a male or female person not in a census family.

Economic family members - Persons other than the reference person (as described above) who belong to the same economic family are classified as female spouses or partners, male or female same-sex spouses or partners, never-married sons or daughters, other sons or daughters or other economic family members. For 2006, other economic family members include foster children. They were previously classified as persons not in economic families.

Persons not in economic families - Household members who do not belong to an economic family. Persons living alone are included in this category.
Sex - Refers to the gender of the respondent.

Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1976 referrer

Footnote 1977

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1977 referrer

Footnote 1978

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1978 referrer

Footnote 1979

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.
Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.
Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.
All other economic families are those in which a person not in a census family is the economic family reference person.
Economic family status - Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not the persons are members of an economic family.

Economic family persons refer to two or more household members who are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, and thereby constitute an economic family. They can be further classified as follows:

Economic family reference persons - In each economic family, one person is designated as the reference person. For purposes of presentation of historically comparable low-income statistics, the following designations have been made. The male spouse or partner is designated as the reference person in opposite-sex couple families. In lone-parent families, the male or female lone parent is the reference person. In same-sex couple families, the first person in the couple listed on the questionnaire is the economic family reference person. In all other economic families, the reference person can be either a male or female person not in a census family.

Economic family members - Persons other than the reference person (as described above) who belong to the same economic family are classified as female spouses or partners, male or female same-sex spouses or partners, never-married sons or daughters, other sons or daughters or other economic family members. For 2006, other economic family members include foster children. They were previously classified as persons not in economic families.

Persons not in economic families - Household members who do not belong to an economic family. Persons living alone are included in this category.
Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1979 referrer

Footnote 1980

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1980 referrer

Footnote 1981

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1981 referrer

Footnote 1982

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.
Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.
Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.
All other economic families are those in which a person not in a census family is the economic family reference person.
Economic family status - Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not the persons are members of an economic family.

Economic family persons refer to two or more household members who are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, and thereby constitute an economic family. They can be further classified as follows:

Economic family reference persons - In each economic family, one person is designated as the reference person. For purposes of presentation of historically comparable low-income statistics, the following designations have been made. The male spouse or partner is designated as the reference person in opposite-sex couple families. In lone-parent families, the male or female lone parent is the reference person. In same-sex couple families, the first person in the couple listed on the questionnaire is the economic family reference person. In all other economic families, the reference person can be either a male or female person not in a census family.

Economic family members - Persons other than the reference person (as described above) who belong to the same economic family are classified as female spouses or partners, male or female same-sex spouses or partners, never-married sons or daughters, other sons or daughters or other economic family members. For 2006, other economic family members include foster children. They were previously classified as persons not in economic families.

Persons not in economic families - Household members who do not belong to an economic family. Persons living alone are included in this category.
Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1982 referrer

Footnote 1983

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1983 referrer

Footnote 1984

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1984 referrer

Footnote 1985

Economic family - Refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption.

The economic family concept requires only that family members be related by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. For example, a widowed mother living with her married son and daughter-in-law would be treated as a non-family person under the definition of a census family. That same person would, however, be counted as a member of an economic family along with her son and daughter-in-law. Two or more related census families living together also constitute one economic family as, for example, a man and his wife living with their married son and daughter-in-law. Two or more brothers or sisters living together, apart from their parents, will form an economic family, but not a census family, since they do not meet the requirements for the latter. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members.
The economic family and its associated classifications and variables are derived according to the responses to the questions on sex, date of birth, marital status, common law status, and relationship to Person 1. In addition, consideration is given to the order in which household members are listed on the questionnaire.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
Prior to 2001, economic families were defined in Hutterite collective households as well.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
Economic family structure - Refers to the classification of economic families into those of couple families, lone-parent families and other economic families.
Couple families are those in which a member of either a married or common-law couple is the economic family reference person.
Lone-parent families are those in which either a male or female lone parent is the economic family reference person.
All other economic families are those in which a person not in a census family is the economic family reference person.
Economic family status - Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not the persons are members of an economic family.

Economic family persons refer to two or more household members who are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, and thereby constitute an economic family. They can be further classified as follows:

Economic family reference persons - In each economic family, one person is designated as the reference person. For purposes of presentation of historically comparable low-income statistics, the following designations have been made. The male spouse or partner is designated as the reference person in opposite-sex couple families. In lone-parent families, the male or female lone parent is the reference person. In same-sex couple families, the first person in the couple listed on the questionnaire is the economic family reference person. In all other economic families, the reference person can be either a male or female person not in a census family.

Economic family members - Persons other than the reference person (as described above) who belong to the same economic family are classified as female spouses or partners, male or female same-sex spouses or partners, never-married sons or daughters, other sons or daughters or other economic family members. For 2006, other economic family members include foster children. They were previously classified as persons not in economic families.

Persons not in economic families - Household members who do not belong to an economic family. Persons living alone are included in this category.
Age - Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from Date of birth.

Return to footnote 1985 referrer

Footnote 1986

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1986 referrer

Footnote 1987

Income status before tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).

Income status after tax - Refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).

Measures of low income known as 'low income (before tax) cut-offs (LICOs)' were first introduced in Canada in 1968 based on 1961 Census income data and 1959 family expenditure patterns. At that time, expenditure patterns indicated that Canadian families spent about 50% of their total income on food, shelter and clothing. It was arbitrarily estimated that families spending 70% or more of their income (20 percentage points more than the average) on these basic necessities would be in 'straitened' circumstances. With this assumption, low income cut-off points were set for five different sizes of families.

Subsequent to these initial cut-offs, revised low income before tax cut-offs were established based on national family expenditure data from 1969, 1978, 1986 and 1992. The initial LICOs were based upon the total income, before tax, of families and persons 15 years and over not in economic families.

After a comprehensive review of low income cut-offs completed in 1991, low income cut-offs based upon after-tax income were published for the first time in Income After Tax, Distributions by Size in Canada, 1990 (Catalogue no. 13-210). Income after tax cut-offs are estimated independently for economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in families based upon family expenditure and income after tax. Consequently, the low income after-tax cut-offs are set at after-tax income levels, differentiated by size of family and area of residence, where families spend 20 percentage points more of their after-tax income than the average family on food, shelter and clothing.

For the purposes of low income statistics (before or after tax), economic families and persons 15 years of age and over not in economic families in the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and on Indian reserves were excluded. The low income cut-offs are based on certain expenditure-income patterns which are not available from survey data for the entire population.

Prevalence of low income (before or after tax) can also be derived for census families, persons not in census families and the population in private households. See Low Income Statistics for Census Families and Households, Staff Report no. 1991-1, Labour and Household Surveys Analysis Division, Statistics Canada.

Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Since its initial publication, Statistics Canada has clearly and consistently emphasized that the LICOs are not measures of poverty. Rather, LICOs reflect a consistent and well-defined methodology that identifies those who are substantially worse-off than average. These measures have enabled Statistics Canada to report important trends, such as the changing composition of those below the LICOs over time.

Low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs) - Income levels at which families or persons not in economic families spend 20% more than average of their before tax income on food, shelter and clothing. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-566-XWE.

Prevalence of low income rates (before or after tax) are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution.

Return to footnote 1987 referrer

Footnote 1988

Household total income - The total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:
- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.


After-tax income of households - The after-tax income of a household is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that household. After-tax income of household members refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons not in families or households (for example, two person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Household - Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy the same dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. It may consist of a family group (census family) with or without other non-family persons, of two or more families sharing a dwelling, of a group of unrelated persons, or of one person living alone. Household members who are temporarily absent on Census Day (e.g., temporary residents elsewhere) are considered as part of their usual household. For census purposes, every person is a member of one and only one household. Unless otherwise specified, all data in household reports are for private households only.

Households are classified into three groups: private households, collective households and households outside Canada.

Private household - Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.

Household size - Refers to the number of persons in a private household.

Return to footnote 1988 referrer

Footnote 2003

Household total income - The total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:
- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.


After-tax income of households - The after-tax income of a household is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that household. After-tax income of household members refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons not in families or households (for example, two person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Household - Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy the same dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. It may consist of a family group (census family) with or without other non-family persons, of two or more families sharing a dwelling, of a group of unrelated persons, or of one person living alone. Household members who are temporarily absent on Census Day (e.g., temporary residents elsewhere) are considered as part of their usual household. For census purposes, every person is a member of one and only one household. Unless otherwise specified, all data in household reports are for private households only.

Households are classified into three groups: private households, collective households and households outside Canada.

Private household - Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.

Household size - Refers to the number of persons in a private household.

Return to footnote 2003 referrer

Footnote 2018

Household total income - The total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:
- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.


After-tax income of households - The after-tax income of a household is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that household. After-tax income of household members refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons not in families or households (for example, two person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Household - Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy the same dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. It may consist of a family group (census family) with or without other non-family persons, of two or more families sharing a dwelling, of a group of unrelated persons, or of one person living alone. Household members who are temporarily absent on Census Day (e.g., temporary residents elsewhere) are considered as part of their usual household. For census purposes, every person is a member of one and only one household. Unless otherwise specified, all data in household reports are for private households only.

Households are classified into three groups: private households, collective households and households outside Canada.

Private household - Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.

Household size - Refers to the number of persons in a private household.

Return to footnote 2018 referrer

Footnote 2033

Household total income - The total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.
'Total income' refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over:
- wages and salaries (total)
- net farm income
- net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice
- child benefits
- Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement
- benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan
- benefits from Employment Insurance
- other income from government sources
- dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income
- retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs
- other money income.


After-tax income of households - The after-tax income of a household is the sum of the after-tax incomes of all members of that household. After-tax income of household members refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial taxes paid for 2005.

Receipts not counted as income - The income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income 'in kind,' such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

Average income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - Average income of families (census/economic) or persons 15 years of age and over not in families or households refers to the weighted mean total income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households in 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (for example, husband-wife families with working wives) or persons not in families or households (for example, two person households) by the number of families, persons not in families, or households in that respective group, whether or not they reported income.

Median income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, and households - The median income of a specified group of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households is that amount which divides their income size distribution, ranked by size of income, into two halves. That is, the incomes of the first half of the families, persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. Median incomes of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families, or households are normally calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

Standard error of average income - Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and a half standard errors.

The above concept and procedures also apply in the calculation of these statistics on the after-tax income of families (census/economic), persons 15 years of age and over not in families and households.

Household - Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy the same dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. It may consist of a family group (census family) with or without other non-family persons, of two or more families sharing a dwelling, of a group of unrelated persons, or of one person living alone. Household members who are temporarily absent on Census Day (e.g., temporary residents elsewhere) are considered as part of their usual household. For census purposes, every person is a member of one and only one household. Unless otherwise specified, all data in household reports are for private households only.

Households are classified into three groups: private households, collective households and households outside Canada.

Private household - Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.

Household size - Refers to the number of persons in a private household.

Return to footnote 2033 referrer

Footnote 2048

Non-farm dwelling refers to a private dwelling, other than one situated on a farm or occupied by a farm operator. Non-reserve dwelling refers to a private dwelling not on a reserve and not band housing.

Return to footnote 2048 referrer

Footnote 2050

Rent, gross
Part A - Plain language definition:
Average monthly total of all shelter expenses paid by tenant households. Gross rent includes the monthly rent and the costs of electricity, heat and municipal services.
Part B - Detailed definition:
Refers to the total average monthly payments paid by tenant households to secure shelter.

Return to footnote 2050 referrer

Footnote 2051

Refers to the proportion of average monthly 2005 total household income which is spent on owner's major payments (in the case of owner-occupied dwellings) or on gross rent (in the case of tenant-occupied dwellings). Includes private households in occupied non-farm, non-reserve dwellings with household income greater than $0 in 2005 (i.e., excludes negative or zero household income).

It should be noted that not all households spending 30% or more of incomes on shelter costs are necessarily experiencing housing affordability problems. This is particularly true of households with high incomes. There are also other households who choose to spend more on shelter than on other goods. Nevertheless, the allocation of 30% or more of a household's income to housing expenses provides a useful benchmark for assessing trends in housing affordability.

The relatively high shelter costs to household income ratios for some households may have resulted from the difference in the reference period for shelter costs and household income data. The reference period for shelter cost data (gross rent for tenants, and owner's major payments for owners) is 2006, while household income is reported for the year 2005. As well, for some households, the 2005 household income may represent income for only part of a year.

Return to footnote 2051 referrer

Footnote 2054

Value of dwelling
Part A - Plain language definition:
Not applicable
Part B - Detailed definition:
Refers to the dollar amount expected by the owner if the dwelling were to be sold.

Return to footnote 2054 referrer

Footnote 2055

Owner's major payments
Part A - Plain language definition:
Average monthly total of all shelter expenses paid by households that own their dwelling. The owner's major payments include, for example, the mortgage payment and the costs of electricity, heat and municipal services.
Part B - Detailed definition:
Refers to the total average monthly payments made by owner households to secure shelter.

Return to footnote 2055 referrer

Footnote 2056

Refers to the proportion of average monthly 2005 total household income which is spent on owner's major payments (in the case of owner-occupied dwellings) or on gross rent (in the case of tenant-occupied dwellings). Includes private households in occupied non-farm, non-reserve dwellings with household income greater than $0 in 2005 (i.e., excludes negative or zero household income).

It should be noted that not all households spending 30% or more of incomes on shelter costs are necessarily experiencing housing affordability problems. This is particularly true of households with high incomes. There are also other households who choose to spend more on shelter than on other goods. Nevertheless, the allocation of 30% or more of a household's income to housing expenses provides a useful benchmark for assessing trends in housing affordability.

The relatively high shelter costs to household income ratios for some households may have resulted from the difference in the reference period for shelter costs and household income data. The reference period for shelter cost data (gross rent for tenants, and owner's major payments for owners) is 2006, while household income is reported for the year 2005. As well, for some households, the 2005 household income may represent income for only part of a year.

Return to footnote 2056 referrer

Footnote 2058

Refers to the proportion of average monthly 2005 total household income which is spent on owner's major payments (in the case of owner-occupied dwellings) or on gross rent (in the case of tenant-occupied dwellings). Includes private households in occupied non-farm, non-reserve dwellings with household income greater than $0 in 2005 (i.e., excludes negative or zero household income).

It should be noted that not all households spending 30% or more of incomes on shelter costs are necessarily experiencing housing affordability problems. This is particularly true of households with high incomes. There are also other households who choose to spend more on shelter than on other goods. Nevertheless, the allocation of 30% or more of a household's income to housing expenses provides a useful benchmark for assessing trends in housing affordability.

The relatively high shelter costs to household income ratios for some households may have resulted from the difference in the reference period for shelter costs and household income data. The reference period for shelter cost data (gross rent for tenants, and owner's major payments for owners) is 2006, while household income is reported for the year 2005. As well, for some households, the 2005 household income may represent income for only part of a year.

Return to footnote 2058 referrer

Footnote 2059

Rent, gross
Part A - Plain language definition:
Average monthly total of all shelter expenses paid by tenant households. Gross rent includes the monthly rent and the costs of electricity, heat and municipal services.
Part B - Detailed definition:
Refers to the total average monthly payments paid by tenant households to secure shelter.

Return to footnote 2059 referrer

Footnote 2060

Refers to the proportion of average monthly 2005 total household income which is spent on owner's major payments (in the case of owner-occupied dwellings) or on gross rent (in the case of tenant-occupied dwellings). Includes private households in occupied non-farm, non-reserve dwellings with household income greater than $0 in 2005 (i.e., excludes negative or zero household income).

It should be noted that not all households spending 30% or more of incomes on shelter costs are necessarily experiencing housing affordability problems. This is particularly true of households with high incomes. There are also other households who choose to spend more on shelter than on other goods. Nevertheless, the allocation of 30% or more of a household's income to housing expenses provides a useful benchmark for assessing trends in housing affordability.

The relatively high shelter costs to household income ratios for some households may have resulted from the difference in the reference period for shelter costs and household income data. The reference period for shelter cost data (gross rent for tenants, and owner's major payments for owners) is 2006, while household income is reported for the year 2005. As well, for some households, the 2005 household income may represent income for only part of a year.

Return to footnote 2060 referrer

Footnote 2062

Owner's major payments
Part A - Plain language definition:
Average monthly total of all shelter expenses paid by households that own their dwelling. The owner's major payments include, for example, the mortgage payment and the costs of electricity, heat and municipal services.
Part B - Detailed definition:
Refers to the total average monthly payments made by owner households to secure shelter.

Return to footnote 2062 referrer

Footnote 2063

Refers to the proportion of average monthly 2005 total household income which is spent on owner's major payments (in the case of owner-occupied dwellings) or on gross rent (in the case of tenant-occupied dwellings). Includes private households in occupied non-farm, non-reserve dwellings with household income greater than $0 in 2005 (i.e., excludes negative or zero household income).

It should be noted that not all households spending 30% or more of incomes on shelter costs are necessarily experiencing housing affordability problems. This is particularly true of households with high incomes. There are also other households who choose to spend more on shelter than on other goods. Nevertheless, the allocation of 30% or more of a household's income to housing expenses provides a useful benchmark for assessing trends in housing affordability.

The relatively high shelter costs to household income ratios for some households may have resulted from the difference in the reference period for shelter costs and household income data. The reference period for shelter cost data (gross rent for tenants, and owner's major payments for owners) is 2006, while household income is reported for the year 2005. As well, for some households, the 2005 household income may represent income for only part of a year.

Return to footnote 2063 referrer

Footnote 2065

Non-immigrants are persons who are Canadian citizens by birth. Although most Canadian citizens by birth were born in Canada, a small number were born outside Canada to Canadian parents.

Return to footnote 2065 referrer

Footnote 2068

The places of birth selected are the ones most frequently reported by immigrants at the Canada level.

Return to footnote 2068 referrer

Footnote 2104

The abbreviation 'n.o.s.' means 'not otherwise specified.'

Return to footnote 2104 referrer

Footnote 2124

'Other country' includes all those places of birth not included in this list.

Return to footnote 2124 referrer

Footnote 2125

Non-permanent residents are persons from another country who, at the time of the census, held a Work or Study Permit, or who were refugee claimants, as well as family members living with them in Canada.

Return to footnote 2125 referrer

Footnote 2126

'Recent immigrants' refers to persons who immigrated to Canada between 2001 and Census Day, May 16, 2006. The places of birth selected are the ones most frequently reported by recent immigrants at the Canada level.

Return to footnote 2126 referrer